SOC 101 is a prerequisite for all courses except SOC 103


SOC101 Introduction to Sociology
3 credits 
This course introduces students to the scientific study of society and several sociological concepts, including, but not limited to: social theory, social research, social economy, social interaction, social class, social construction, gender stratification, race and ethnicity, family, and deviance. This course will help students to examine the social world around them using the sociological imagination. Students will learn how to connect research to concepts, deepening their understanding of the social world and social phenomena and develop critical thinking skills.

SOC103 Social Problems
3 credits 
Causes, scope, and possible solutions to social problems in American society.

SOC210 Introduction to Social Research
3 credits 
This course provides students with an overview of the social science research process and introduces them to the various methodological strategies used by social scientists. The various steps by which research is conducted will be examined such as study design and implementation, data collection and interpretation of findings. Students will also be able to critique the strengths and limitations of difference research methodologies.

SOC211 Quantitative Methods for Sociologists
3 credits 
This course is designed to introduce students to descriptive and inferential statistics used in sociology, criminology, and other social sciences.  We will cover measures of central tendency and variation, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, and bivariate techniques such as correlation and an introduction to regression. 
Prerequisite: SOC 210.   Co-Requisite:  SOC 212.

SOC212 Quantitative Methods Lab
1 credit 
Statistical lab associated with SOC 211 introduces the use of computer statistical packages for analyzing quantitative data.
Co-requisite: SOC 211. 

SOC270 Deviant Behavior
3 credits 
This course is an introduction to the study of deviant behaviors. We will examine the ways in which deviance is constructed and defined. Major sociological perspectives and theories will be applied in order to understand how they aid in the formation and development of social deviance. In addition, various forms of deviant behaviors will be discussed, including: drug use, sexual deviance, violence, suicide, LGBT issues, inequality, and crime. The role of social control will also be examined in terms of how it impacts the way in which deviance is understood in society.

SOC271 Criminal Justice
3 credits 
This course will provide students with both an introduction to the basics of the criminal justice system and a critical approach to contemporary issues in the field. We will focus on the nature of crime and how it is measured; issues in policing and law enforcement; the judicial system and legal process; sentencing; corrections; and prison life. Throughout the course, we will focus on current controversies and debates, including such issues as the war on drugs, racism in the criminal justice system, violent crime rates, and incarceration rates.

SOC291 Special Topics
3 credits 
Content will vary by semester.

SOC301 Social Organization

3 credits 
The focus of this course is formal organizations, with an emphasis on the workplace. The topics that are discussed include theories of work, organizational paradigms, bureaucracy, the impact of technology, unionization, and the new workplace. The fundamental theme is how organizational style influences productivity.

SOC302 Social Psychology: Sociological Perspective
3 credits 
The influence of human groups and social processes on individual behavior, and personality.
Prerequisite: SOC 101 or PSY 110.

SOC303 Social Inequalities
3 credits 
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the sociological approach to the analysis of
structured socioeconomic inequality (a.k.a. “social stratification”) in contemporary American society. In this regard, emphases are placed on identifying trends, causes, and consequences of the distribution of a wide range of material (e.g. income, wealth) and symbolic (status, prestige) rewards in American society.

SOC304 Dynamics of Poverty in the United States
3 credits 
Examines trends in the incidence and causes of major types of poverty among the urban underclass, the homeless, migrant laborers, the working poor. Also, explores policy-related solutions. 

SOC305 Globalization of Society
3 credits 
Concepts and theories that are currently in use to understand globalization both as a process and as a structure: social aspects and narratives of globalization, and theoretical sociological models as scaffolding for understanding many of the disparate characteristics of globalization. Globalization as it spans disciplinary division and its understanding: the emergence of novel economic forms and practices as a pivotal driving force for globalization. Human migrations and their consequences on cultural identity and diffusion, and the role of the technology in the creation and consolidation the global world. New and complex structures of socioeconomic inequality at national and at transnational levels, the disproportionately important roles that women play in these new structures of inequality, and the social forces and movements that have emerged to resist globalization or to alter it in important ways.

SOC306 Wealth and Poverty in Contemporary America
3 credits 
The causes and consequences of rapidly changing patterns of concentration of socioeconomic resources, such as wealth and income in America. This changing concentration is associated with the proliferation of impoverishment and privilege in America. Analyzes macroeconomic changes, demographic shifts, technological advances, and evolving ideological postures as sources of these trends.

SOC320 Social Epidemiology
3 credits 
This course introduces students to social epidemiology and the sociological study of health and longevity. Specifically, this course examines the ways in which key sociological variables structure, shape, or patterns the health and longevity of the US population. This course covers several variables of sociological interest, including socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, sex/gender, age, family status, and religion.

SOC321 Applied Health Policy
3 credits 
This course examines the role of public and private institutions in health promotion, health care delivery, and health insurance. We will explore the theoretical and practical reasons for intervention in health-related decisions and health care markets, the related empirical evidence, and the effects of these interventions on health outcomes and social welfare. Students will understand how and why government and society in general attempts to influence health-related behaviors and health insurance markets, and the resulting effects on individuals’ choices, expenditures, health outcomes, and overall quality of life.

SOC332 Collective Behavior
3 credits 
Classical theories, issues, and research on fads, fashions, riots, crowd behavior, social movements and other forms of collective behavior. 

SOC335 LGBTQ Communities
3 credits 
The course examines gender, race, age and class differences in the experiences of gays and lesbians. A life-span perspective guides the course after the presentation of some background of biological, psychological, and sociological theories pertaining to homosexuality. 

SOC340 Sociology of Religion
3 credits 
Social foundations of religion, growth, and change within religious institutions and relationships of religion to other institutions. 

SOC341 Social and Cultural Change
3 credits 
Survey of major theories of change; analysis of the processes and mechanisms of change.

SOC342 Contemporary Latin American Societies
3 credits 
Social characteristics of Latin American societies and their comparison with North American society. 

SOC345 Population and Society

3 credits 
Demographic analysis of fertility, mortality, sex-age structure, migration, urbanization and population control. 

SOC350 Sociology of the Family

3 credits 
This course presents a critical investigation of the family while applying sociological theories, perspectives, and concepts, based on current research in the field. As the family is an important institution in social life and one in which have all experienced in some way, we will see that there is not “one” particular way of experiencing this institution. The various definitions and versions of the family will be addressed historically, with an emphasis on how they are shaped by public perception. In addition, more recent trends in family life will be addressed, including cohabitation, marriage, divorce, parenthood, family policy, family structure, and marginalized family types.

SOC351 Business and Society
3 credits 
This course will explore the influence of business objectives, values, and ethics on American culture, moral standards, and societal institutions. A careful analysis of the choices made by individuals, companies, and governments will demonstrate that sensible “choice architecture” can successfully nudge people toward better decisions without restricting their freedom of choice. Specific topics include: corporate social responsibility; ethical issues in business; business and government in a global society; business and public policy: the corporation and the natural environment; business and technological change; and business relationships with consumers and employees. 

SOC352 Sport and Society
3 credits 
This course explores the status position and role of sport in society. Our primary focus will be upon delineating and analyzing sport as a major social institution in American society. Thus our perspective will be that of the sociologist (i.e., critical more in analysis than in judgment) rather than that of a sports journalist or sports fan. We shall examine both amateur and professional sports in terms of their interlocking relationships with each other and with other major social institutions (e.g., education, economics, and politics) as well as their significance for promoting and maintaining cultural values such as competition, fair play, teamwork, gender roles, and the like. The objective is to provide students with critical assessment and analytical skills for examining and understanding the impact of sports on both individuals and society.

SOC365 Internship
6 credits 
This course provides exposure to and insight into the operations of community non-profit or government based social service agencies. The course involves prearranged study and supervised work in a variety of organizations and institutions, affording students the opportunity to use their sociological imagination while providing a "hands-on" sociological experience in the local community.
Prerequisite: Six credits: SOC 101 and 271 or 371.

SOC368 Violence in America

3 credits 
In this class, issues relevant to the study of violence in the United States will be covered. While the emphasis throughout will be on street violence (i.e., homicide, robbery, rape, and aggravated assault), other forms (e.g., corporate violence, intimate partner violence) will also be covered. In particular, we will: Examine violence in historical, international, and situational contexts, examine the major explanations of violence, and examine the factors associated with violent crime. We will also consider how we seek to control violence in the U.S.

SOC369 Crime and Public Policy
3 credits 
This course examines the dimensions and causes of the crime problem in America, and the uses and limits of the criminal justice system in dealing with it. We will examine the enormous expansion of the American prison system in recent years, and ask how much it has affected the crime rate. Additionally, we will consider a variety of possible strategies for preventing or controlling so-called “street” crime, both within the criminal justice system and beyond it—including prevention and rehabilitation programs as well as expanding social and economic opportunities. Along the way, we will pay particular attention to several controversial issues, including the death penalty, drugs, and gun control.
Prerequisite: SOC 371

SOC370 Juvenile Delinquency
3 credits
This course applies sociological perspectives and concepts to examine juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system.  The course takes into account the various social factors that shape juvenile delinquency and its control, such as race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, and sexuality.  In addition, students will take a critical view of the policies developed to control such behavior.

SOC371 Criminology
3 credits 
This course introduces the concepts of crime and criminal law, reviews several theoretical approaches to studying crime and criminal behavior, and focuses on several types of crime.  In particular, it includes such topics as definitions of crime, sources of crime statistics, correlates and causes of crime, terrorism, genocide, corporate crime, and cyber crime.

SOC372 Criminology: Police and Community

3 credits
A study of policing in U.S. society.  Interaction with groups and institutions.  The overall objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the role of the police in American society.  The source will focus on the sociological study of policing, not professional training to become a police officer.  Students will gain a better understanding of the history of the police, their role in American society and in the American system of criminal justice.  In addition, students will discuss and critique important issues and trends in modern policing.

SOC373 Criminology: Courts and Society
3 credits 
This course examines the importance of the criminal courts and the impact that the criminal courts have on society. You will gain a realistic sense of what it is like to work in and be a part of the criminal justice system. The roles and responsibilities of the major courthouse players will be discussed. You will discover the challenging situations that judges must navigate as well as the difficulties that confront prosecutors and defense
attorneys as they deal with victims, defendants and crushing caseloads.

SOC374 Criminology: Corrections
3 credits 
Corrections in the U.S. society; philosophies of rehabilitation, punishment, and incapacitation.

SOC375 Sociology of Mental Health and Illness
3 credits 
Social factors in the etiology, prevalence, consequences of, and reaction to mental disorders. 

SOC377 Sociology of Drug Abuse
3 credits 
This course applies sociological perspectives and concepts to examine drug use and abuse.  The course examines the historical and theoretical understanding of the social causes and consequences of drug use, as well as the correlates of use and abuse.  The course also takes a critical perspective on the policies developed to reduce the harms associated with drug use and abuse.

SOC378 Criminology: Law and Society

3 credits 
How law, crime, and justice systems in the United States relate to social structure.  The course covers two major themes: lawmaking (and how it relates to lawbreaking) and the justice system.

SOC380 Sociology of Gender

3 credits 
Social and historical construction of gender. Discussion of gender and various social institutions and categories.

SOC381 Aging in Society
3 credits 
The aging processes, the aged and social institutions; special issues. 

SOC382 The U.S. Jewish Community
3 credits 
Application of minority group analysis to the U.S. Jewish community. 

SOC383 Sociology of Education
3 credits
This course focuses on the examination and analysis of education as a major social institution.  As such, this course assesses the structure, processes, and interaction patterns within the educational system.  All levels (elementary, secondary, and postsecondary), and types (public and private) of education are considered.  The course also examines the impact of education on social stratification, social mobility, and socioeconomic inequality, especially along race, gender, and class lines.

SOC384 Medical Sociology

3 credits 
This course examines a brief early history, methods, theory and concepts of social science research on health and health care mainly from the last half of the previous century to the present. We will explore gender, race, class, age, social and cultural differences in the experiences of individuals as they deal with health and illness across the life course. The course will provide students with a sociological analysis of a broad array of health/illness issues and the health services industry.

SOC385 U.S. Latinos
3 credits 
Sociological perspectives are employed in the examination of the historical, social, economic, and cultural experiences of Latino/as in the Unites States. 

SOC386 U.S. Immigration
3 credits 
The major sociological debates in the field of immigration with an emphasis on recent immigrants to the U.S. 

SOC387 Race and Ethnic Relations

3 credits 
This course introduces students to the nature and dynamics of race and ethnic relations with particular emphasis on racial and ethnic groups in the United States.  We examine basic concepts and major theories in the analysis of race and ethnic relations, racial and ethnic inequality, past and recent immigration experiences, and the historical and current status of specific racial and ethnic groups.  Students will also be engaged in a variety of exercises designed to develop critical assessment and analytical skills for examining and understanding issues related to race and ethnicity.

SOC388 The Black Ghetto in Urban Society
3 credits
This course examines the origin and development of the concept of “ghetto” and application of this concept to both past and contemporary views of black life in America.  Students are introduced to the historical and social significance of the black ghetto in the context of the larger body of literature on the ghetto phenomenon.  Emphasis is placed on gaining an understanding and developing critical insight into issues and prospects for the resolution of issues related to black ghettoization.

SOC389 The Black Athlete in White America
3 credits
This course examines the impact of racism on sport in the United States with a specific focus on the Black athlete.  Drawing upon the literature on race and sport in America, the course takes a historical view of the social context in which black athletes have competed and excelled in their craft against tremendous odds both inside and outside of sport competition.

SOC390 Directed Studies
1- 3 credits 
Individually supervised readings or research on special topics offered by arrangement with instructor. 

SOC391 Special Topics
3 credits 
Content will vary by semester.

SOC401 Sociological Theory
3 credits 
Examined in this course is the work of theorists such as Comte, Durkheim, Marx, Weber, Parsons, and symbolic
interactionists. The epistemology, methodology, and social ontology of each theory is discussed, along with the social context and chief concerns of each theorist.
Prerequisite: Nine credits in Sociology and senior standing.

SOC 410 Social Research Practicum
1-3 credits 
Each student will work directly with a designated faculty mentor to obtain general research training, data analysis techniques, and technical writing skills. As part of the research practicum, students will work in collaboration with their faculty mentor to prepare a journal-length research manuscript and assemble related research materials to gain practical knowledge of the scientific research process. This one-on-one experience will also enhance students’ training in sociology and provide them with useful analysis and writing skills when they enter the job market.
Prerequisites: SOC 101, SOC 210, SOC 211, SOC 212.

SOC470 Theories of Deviant Behavior
3 credits 
This course explores various theories of causes of deviance/crime. It begins with an overview of the early classical and positivist foundations of criminological thought and then moves on to discussing more recent extensions of social disorganization, strain, control, social learning, and other contemporary theories of crime.  It also covers the role of theory in scientific research, familiarizes with the foundations of current theoretical debates in criminology, and introduces the empirical research on the reviewed theories.
Prerequisite: SOC 371.

SOC480 Health Disparities in the U.S.
3 credits 
This course will provide a comprehensive examination of U.S. health disparities based on a variety of social variables, including race and ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and the environment.  In doing so, this course will draw on theoretical perspectives from multiple disciplines to examine the relationship between social factors and health outcomes.  The most pressing U.S. health disparities will be discussed and put into a historical and global context in order to identify priorities for the elimination of health disparities.  After exploring the known and suspected causes of disparities in health outcomes, attention will turn to an overview of the common multi-level strategies used to reduce health disparities.  Students will go away with a broad-based understanding of current health disparities issues and the ability to critically examine these issues.

SOC487 Race, Ethnicity, and Criminal Justice

3 credits
This course will provide an in-depth examination of the relationships involving race, ethnicity, immigration, crime, and the criminal justice system.  We will consider why these are important issues to study, how and what we know about these relationships, and how we might explain them.  We will direct attention to research on defining race and ethnicity, racial and ethnic variations in criminal victimization and offending, population distributions, policing, the court system and sentencing, corrections, and the death penalty.  Our approach will primarily be sociological, although where appropriate we will draw from other disciplines (e.g., political science, history, etc.) as well.
Prerequisite: Six credits in Sociology.

SOC488 Gender and Crime

3 credits 
Examination of gender, power, and crime, including feminist theories and the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: Six credits in Sociology.

SOC490 Directed Studies in Sociology

1- 3 credits 
Supervised independent study on special topics. Arrangement with individual faculty.
Prerequisite: SOC 101, junior/senior standing, overall GPA 2.75 or higher, and permission of instructor.

SOC491 Special Topics - Crime and Public Policy

3 credits
Prerequisite: Six credits in Sociology.

SOC492 Special Topics

3 credits 
Prerequisite: Six credits in Sociology.

SOC493 Special Topics

3 credits 
Prerequisite: Six credits in Sociology.

SOC498 Senior Honors Thesis in Sociology or Criminology I

3- 6 credits
Independent research project.
Prerequisite: 18 credits in Sociology/Criminology including SOC 210 and 211.

SOC499 Senior Honors Thesis in Sociology or Criminology II

3- 6 credits
Independent research project.
Prerequisite: 18 credits in Sociology/Criminology including SOC 210 and 211.