Program Curriculum :

Core (Required) Courses:

SOC 609. SOCIAL STATISTICS. 3 Credit Hours.
Probability theory, descriptive statistics and tests of independence.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC 610. Advanced Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.
Quantitative techniques for the measurement of theoretical constructs, the consequences of technique selection, and the relationships between method and underlying theory.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC670 The Criminal Justice System: Theory and Practice. 3 Credit Hours
Historical and philosophical assessment of the criminal justice system in the United States. Analysis and critique of current developments in crime control.

SOC 673. The Criminal Justice System. 3 Credit Hours.
This course is intended to introduce students to the criminal justice system.  It covers historical and current concepts of criminal justice, the interrelationships among the different components of the system, and the roles and functions of the system in American society.  The four major areas covered include philosophies of punishment, policing, courts, and corrections. Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC 677. Criminology and Public Policy. 3 Credit Hours.
This seminar will focus on various issues in crime and criminal justice policy and the role of criminological theory and research in addressing them.  The topics will include trends in crime rates, guns and violence, gangs, drugs and crime, policing, courts and sentencing, community corrections and offender re-entry, capital punishment, and environmental criminology.  Emphasis will be on understanding implications of theoretical criminology for criminal justice practice and on examining the role of scientific research and empirical evidence in addressing the issues in crime and justice.  The seminar will also cover various crime control strategies and crime prevention programs and discuss their effectiveness and challenges to their implementation.
Components:
SEM.
Grading:
GRD.
Typically Offered:
Offered by Announcement Only.

 

Elective Courses:

SOC 611. Advanced Sociological Statistical Analysis I. 3 Credit Hours.
Multiple linear regression and regression diagnostics using Stata, analysis of categorical dependent variables, count dependent variables, simultaneous equations, and panel data models. Some topics may not be covered and others may be added at the discretion of the instructor.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

SOC 613. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.
In-depth introduction to qualitative, inductive methods, with emphases on grounded theory and action research. Focus on qualitative interviewing (including focus groups) and participant observation for the collection of data in naturalistic social settings, with simultaneous data analysis; qualitative methods in mixed-methods research introduced. Covers ties between methods and theory, additional basic methods used in qualitative research, and typical analytic approaches; touch on more esoteric methods; study current issues and debates relevant to this set of approaches to generating knowledge.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC 672. Research in Crime and Delinquency. 3 Credit Hours.
Measurement issues; effects of race, gender, age, and socio-economic status on criminality; extra-legal factors affecting criminal justice decision making.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC 674.  Seminar on Policing. 3 Credit Hours.
The overall objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the role of police in American society.  The course will focus on the sociological study of policing: the analysis and evaluation of research.  Students will gain a better understanding of the history of the police, their role in American society and in the American system of criminal justice.  In addition, drawing on current research studies, students will discuss and critique important issues and trends in modern policing.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC 675. Courts, Corrections and Punishment. 3 Credit Hours.
This course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of criminal court systems, sentencing, and corrections.  We will draw from sociological, criminological, and sociolegal perspectives to blend both theory and policy perspectives in order to examine these systems critically.  Particular attention will be given to racial, gender, and class disparities in criminal justice punishment.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC 676. Seminar on Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Credit Hours.
The overall objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the current research and knowledge on juvenile delinquency.  Students will learn about the nature and extent of delinquency, the social causes of juvenile delinquency, and assess research concerning social factors leading to delinquency.  In addition, students will study current thinking and research concerning the control and prevention of delinquency.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC 679. Communities and Crime. 3 Credit Hours.
This course examines various aspects of the relationships between communities, crime and crime control.  Major theoretical traditions – such as social disorganization theory, routine activities theory, and broken windows – will be addressed.  In addition, issues concerning the roles of neighborhood structure and process, and their relationship with various forms of crime and policing will be addressed.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC 680. Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.
This course seminar provides an in-depth examination of the relationships involving race, ethnicity, immigration; crime, and the criminal justice system.  We will consider why these are important issues to study, how and what we know about these relationships, and how we might explain them.  We will direct attention to research on defining race and ethnicity, racial and ethnic variations in criminal victimization and offending, population distributions, policing, the court system and sentencing, corrections, and the death penalty.  Our approach will primarily be sociological, although where appropriate we will draw on other disciplines (e.g., political science, history) as well.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC 681. Sociology of Violence. 3 Credit Hours.
In this graduate seminar, issues relevant to the sociology of violence will be covered.  The course will primarily focus on violence in the United States.  While the emphasis throughout will be on street violence (i.e., homicide, robbery, rape, and aggravated assault), other forms of violence (e.g., corporate violence, family violence) will also be covered.  In particular, we will examine: violence in historical, international and situational contexts, the major explanations of it, the factors associated with it, and efforts to control and prevent violence.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC 682. Alcohol, Drugs and Crime. 3 Credit Hours.
In this course, we explore the different categories of illegal drugs and review their basic psychopharmacology, the sociological constructions of the dangers of drug use, the racialization of drug use and connections with “dangerous classes” of people, and the social consequences of America’s particular brand of social control.  The goals of this course are to present these issues in all their complexity and explore some of the repercussions of addressing them in the ways that the US has chosen.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

SOC 683. Comparative Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.
This graduate seminar focuses on understanding of crime and justice issues from a comparative, cross-national standpoint.  Students will begin with placing extant definitions of crime and deviance in cultural contexts, learning existing methods of studying crime on a global scale, and discuss various types of criminal behavior that occur in isolated group contexts as well as those that transcend country boundaries. Topics will include genocide, transnational organized crime, human trafficking, and international terrorism. Various strategies designed to address these acts of crime on a national as well as transnational level will also be discussed.  Further, this seminar will review criminal justice systems from select countries around the world and their response to both localized and transnational crime. The nations examined will include European and Asian states, developing counties, and socialist societies.  Overall, this seminar will emphasize critical comparative analysis of crime and justice issues.  For example, it will teach students to raise questions about the effectiveness and appropriateness of various institutions and policies dealing with crime and justice in different parts of the world.  In addition, this perspective will not only educate students about a global nature of crime and justices issues but also enhance their comprehension of those issues in the United States. 
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.