May 2015 Book of the Month

Each month the College of Arts & Sciences selects a faculty publication to highlight as the Book of the Month.

Amie Thomasson, Professor in the Department of Philosophy, author of ­Ontology Made Easy (Oxford University Press, 2014).

Ontology Made Easy

The most prominent challenge to mainstream ontological debates has come from the idea that disputants can be seen as using the quantifier with different meanings, leaving the dispute merely verbal. Nearly all of the work in defense of hard ontology has gone into arguing against quantifier variance. This book argues that hard ontology faces an entirely different challenge that comes from the 'easy approach to ontology'. The idea of the easy approach is that many ontological questions can be answered by undertaking trivial inferences from uncontroversial premises, making prolonged disputes about the questions out of place.

The College of Arts & Sciences Book of the Month is selected by the Dean's Office. To nominate a publication please visit here.

April 2015 Book of the Month

Each month the College of Arts & Sciences selects a faculty publication to highlight as the Book of the Month.

Guido Ruggiero, Professor in the Department of History, author of ­The Renaissance in Italy: A Social and Cultural History of the Rinascimento (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

The Renaissance in Italy: A Social and Cultural History of the Rinascimento

This book offers an innovative way of thinking about the Italian Renaissance as a historical period and a historical movement. Guido Ruggiero's work is based on archival research and new insights of social and cultural history and literary criticism, with a special emphasis on everyday culture, gender, violence, and sexuality. The book offers a vibrant and relevant critical study of a period too long burdened by anachronistic ways of thinking about the past. Familiar, yet alien; pre-modern, but suggestively post-modern; attractive and troubling, this book returns the Italian Renaissance to center stage in our past and in our historical analysis.

The College of Arts & Sciences Book of the Month is selected by the Dean's Office. To nominate a publication please visit here.

March 2015 Book of the Month

Each month the College of Arts & Sciences selects a faculty publication to highlight as the Book of the Month.

J. Bryan Page, Professor in the Department of Anthopology, author of ­Social Value of Drug Addicts: Uses of the Useless (Left Coast Press, 2013).

Social Value of Drug Addicts: Uses of the Useless

Drug users are typically portrayed as worthless slackers, burdens on society, and just plain useless—culturally, morally, and economically. By contrast, this book argues that the social construction of some people as useless is in fact extremely useful to other people. Leading medical anthropologists Singer and Page analyze media representations, drug policy, and underlying social structures to show what industries and social sectors benefit from the criminalization, demonization, and even popular glamorization of addicts

The College of Arts & Sciences Book of the Month is selected by the Dean's Office. To nominate a publication please visit here.

February 2015 Book of the Month

Each month the College of Arts & Sciences selects a faculty publication to highlight as the Book of the Month.

Berit Brogaard, Professor in the Department of Philosophy, author of ­On Romantic Love: Simple Truths about a Complex Emotion (Oxford University Press, 2015).

On Romantic Love: Simple Truths about a Complex Emotion:

Romantic love presents some of life's most challenging questions. Can we choose who to love? Is romantic love rational? Can we love more than one person at a time? And can we make ourselves fall out of love? In On Romantic Love, Berit Brogaard attempts to get to the bottom of love's many contradictions. This short book, informed by both historical and cutting edge philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, combines a new theory of romantic love with entertaining anecdotes from real life and accessible explanations of the neuroscience underlying our wildest passions.  

The College of Arts & Sciences Book of the Month is selected by the Dean's Office. To nominate a publication please visit here.

January 2015 Book of the Month

Each month the College of Arts & Sciences selects a faculty publication to highlight as the Book of the Month.

Hugh M. Thomas, Professor in the Department of History, author of ­The Secular Clergy in England, 1066-1216 (Oxford University Press, 2014).

About ­The Secular Clergy in England, 1066-1216:

The secular clergy - priests and other clerics outside of monastic orders - were among the most influential and powerful groups in European society during the central Middle Ages. The secular clergy got their title from the Latin word for world, saeculum, and secular clerics kept the Church running in the world beyond the cloister wall, with responsibility for the bulk of pastoral care and ecclesiastical administration. This gave them enormous religious influence, although they were considered too worldly by many contemporary moralists - trying, for instance, to oppose the elimination of clerical marriage and concubinage.

 

The College of Arts & Sciences Book of the Month is selected by the Dean's Office. To nominate a publication please visit here.