Frank L. Samson, Ph.D.

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

Merrick Building, Room 120D
flsamson@miami.edu
(305) 284-6154

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EDUCATION
  • Ph.D., Sociology, Stanford University, 2009
  • M.A., Sociology, Stanford University, 2001
  • M.T.S., Theological Studies (Ethics and Society), Harvard University, 2000
  • B.S., Cybernetics, University of California - Los Angeles, 1996

  • Continuing Education
  • Translational Health Disparities, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities
        [AMA credit]

RESEARCH INTERESTS
  • Race and ethnic relations; inequality; social, political, and health psychology

WORKING MANUSCRIPTS

Under review

  • Currently being reviewed are one revised-and-resubmitted manuscript (single-authored) from BMJ Open (British Medical Journal - Open Access), one co-authored manuscript (equal authorship), and one single-authored manuscript. A fourth manuscript (single-authored) that received a revise and resubmit from Society and Mental Health is in-progress. Manuscript outcomes cover physician distrust, depression/anxiety, smoking, and psychological distress.

Ongoing projects

  • Clinical outcomes of biventricular versus single-chamber ventricular pacing (cardiologist co-author)

SELECTED RECENT PUBLICATIONS
  • Samson, Frank L.  2015. “Perceived Group Competition and Charitable Giving: Racial Prejudice Affect as a Mediating Factor.” Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly  Published online before print. Link
  • Kohn-Wood, Laura P., Frank L. Samson, and Jomills H. Braddock.  2015. “Race, Social Identity and Generative Spaces: Miami as a Microcosm of Categorical Complexity in a 21st-Century Global City.” American Behavioral Scientist  59(3):386-405. Link
  • Samson, Frank L.  2015. “Racial Resentment and Smoking.” Social Science & Medicine  126:164-168.  Link  || PubMed Link
  • Samson, Frank L.  2015.  "Asian American Attitudes towards a U.S. Citizenship Path for Illegal Immigrants: Immigration Reform as Racialised Politics."  Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies  41(1):117-137. Link
  • Samson, Frank L. and Lawrence D. Bobo.   2014.  "Ethno-Racial Attitudes and Social Inequality."  Chapter 21 (Pp. 515-545) of The Handbook of the Social Psychology of Inequality, edited by Jane D. McLeod, Edward J. Lawler, and Michael Schwalbe. New York: Springer. Link
  • Samson, Frank L.  2014.  "Segmented Political Assimilation: Perceptions of Racialized Opportunities and Latino Immigrants' Partisan Identification."  Ethnic and Racial Studies  37(3):467-495. Link
  • Samson, Frank L.  2013.  "Altering Public University Admission Standards to Preserve White Group Position in the United States."  Comparative Education Review  57(3):369-396. (Lead article) Link
    • 2015. Reprinted in Fair Access to Higher Education: Global Perspectives, edited by Anna Mountford-Zimdars, Daniel Sabbagh, and David Post. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.  Link
  • Samson, Frank L.  2013.  "Multiple Group Threat and Malleable White Attitudes towards Academic Merit."  Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race  10(1):233-260. Link
  • Samson, Frank L.  2012.  "Perceptions of Racialized Opportunities and Hispanics' Political Attitudes: Predicting Support for School Vouchers and Government Intervention in Health Care."  American Behavioral Scientist  56(11):1524-1563. Link
  • Samson, Frank L.  2012. "Race and the Limits of American Democracy: African Americans from the Fall of Reconstruction to the Rise of the Ghetto."   Chapter 3 (Pp. 71-122) of The Oxford Handbook of African American Citizenship, 1865-Present, edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. et al. New York: Oxford University Press.  Link

COURSES

SELECTED RECENT FUNDED RESEARCH
  • Principal Investigator. 2012. “Symbolic Nativism and Civic Engagement in the United States.” (Provost Research Award, University of Miami: $16,990)
  • Principal Investigator. 2010. “Hispanics and the Political Psychology of Race.” (Provost Research Award, University of Miami: $14,589)
  • Co-Principal Investigator (with David Grusky). 2008. “Admissions and Success in Education and the Labor Market.” (Dissertation Improvement Grant, National Science Foundation: $7,500)