Maria Galli Stampino

Professor of French and Italian

 

Degrees

  • -PhD, MA in Italian - Stanford University 1996
  • -MA in American Studies - University of Kansas 1990
  • -Laurea in Modern Languages - Università cattolica “Sacro Cuore,” Milan 1988 

Research Interests

  • -Early Modern Literature and Culture
  • -Gender and Women’s Studies
  • -Theater and Performance 

Selected Publications 

  • -Lucrezia Marinella.  L’Enrico, ovvero Bisanzio acquistato.  Edizione critica a cura di Maria Galli Stampino.  Modena: Mucchi (2011). Pp. 608. Print.
  • -Julie D. Campbell and Maria Galli Stampino, editors.  In Dialogue with the Other Voice in Sixteenth-Century Italy: Literary and Social Contexts for Women’s Writing. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe, the Toronto Series. Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2011. Pp. 385. Print.
  • -Lucrezia Marinella.  Enrico, or Byzantium Conquered. Heroic Poem.  Ed. and transl. Maria Galli Stampino.  The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe.  Chicago: U of Chicago P: 2009. Pp. 477. Print and On-Line.
  • -Staging the Pastoral: Tasso’s Aminta and the Emergence of Modern Western Theater.  Tempe, AZ: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 2005. Pp. xviii + 310. Print.
  • -“Fantasmi di genere ne L’Enrico, overo Bisanzio acquistato, poema eroico.” “Becoming Lucrezia”: Literary and Philosophical Education in the Life and Work of Lucrezia Marinelli.  Ed. Antonella Cagnolati.  St. Augustin bei Bonn: Academia Verlag, 2011 (forthcoming). Print.
  • -“Forgetting the Mediterranean: Renaissance Historiography and Xenophobia in Contemporary Italian Culture.”  Reviving the Italian Renaissance. Popular Culture + Icons + Significant Anachronisms.  Ed. Medina Lasansky.  Pittsburgh: Periscope, 2012 (forthcoming). Print.
  • -“A Regent and Her Court: Towards a Study of Maria Maddalena d’Austria’s Patronage (Florence 1621-28).”  Forum Italicum 40.1 (Spring 2006): 22-35. Print.
  • -“Pastoral Constraints, Textual and Dramatic Strategies: Isabella Andreini’s La Mirtilla and Torquato Tasso’s Aminta.”  Italian Culture 22 (2004): 1-20. Print. 

Courses Taught

  • -The Concept of “Renaissance”
  • -The Body of the Beloved in Italian, French and English Early Modern Poetry
  • -Early Modern Humor
  • -Women Writing and Publishing in Early Modern Venice and Lyon
  • -Cathérine de’ Medici: Florentine Princess, French Regent

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