MLS601 2K

Professor Bruce Miller
Mondays | 6:25-9:05 pm | Merrick 309

Aspects of Creative & Reflective Thought

Selected aspects of creative and reflective thought, based on materials from the arts, the humanities, the sciences, the social sciences, and history. The focus is on themes and issues represented on a variety of cultural traditions. The course is intended to equip the student for participation in higher academic discourse generally, and specifically for graduate-level academic work in liberal studies.

*This is a MALS required core course


 

MLS602  1U

Professor George Wilson
Tuesdays | 6:25-9:05 pm | Merrick 092

Perspectives on Human Nature

Basic theories of human nature proposed by the humanities, the sciences, and the social sciences.  The course deals with insights, provided by different perspectives into human nature and related issues, such as the nature of the self and its relation to society, the impact of culture on self-perception, and the relation of thought to human action.  Special attention will be given to the historical development of theories of human nature and their implications for social and political policy.

 *This is a MALS required core course


 

MLS603 5K

Professor Manuel Huerta
Wednesdays | 6:25-9:05 pm | Knight Physics Building 109

Theories of the Physical Universe

This course will examine a variety of theories and models of the physical universe including perspectives from various physical sciences and disciplines such as philosophy, religion and history.

*This is a MALS required core course


 

MLS611 3K

Professor John Kirby
Wednesdays | 6:25-9:05 pm | Merrick 214 F

Vampires in Folklore, Fiction and Film

Why exactly is it that the notion of The Vampire so captures out imagination? Whence this obsessive interest in such an extraordinary and macabre tradition? What do these remarkable intersections of actual history, folklore, high literary art, and popular culture tell us about the human condition today?

This course examines the lore of the vampire, from early traditional sources, through Twilight and True Blood, to the latest vampire books and movies, by way of Bram Stoker’s immortal Dracula and Anne Rice’s immensely popular Vampire Chronicles. The connection between literary sources and cinema will be highlighted.

The goals of this course include:
- Get a deeper understanding of one of the most fascinating aspects of current popular culture
- Inquire into major issues such as ‘What does it mean to be human?’ and ‘What are the implications of death?’
- Learn to watch movies critically, and to develop an aesthetics of screen media
- Gain a nuanced sense of cultures other than those encountered in America, and the principal values that are shared across all cultures


 
 
MLS621 1K

Professor Patrick McCarthy  
Mondays | 6:25-9:05 pm | Merrick 214 F

Utopian and Dystopian Literature

This seminar looks at utopian writings that describe ideal societies; at the anti-utopian works that satirize the idea of utopia; and at dystopias that portray the utopian dream as a nightmare. After an overview of major early utopian works by such authors as Plato, Thomas More, Francis Bacon, and Jonathan Swift we will focus on writings from the late 19th century on. In discussing the novels, we will keep in mind both the historical contexts in which they were written and the way they each respond to, and reshape, utopia as a literary genre.


 
 
MLS625  UV

Professor David Graf 
Tuesdays | 6:25-9:05 pm | Merrick 214 F

Age of Augustus 

When Caesar adopted Gaius Octavius, he brought about the transition from Republic to Empire in Rome, and the Augustan Principate. The Age of Augustus saw revolutionary changes that transformed Rome, Romanized the provinces, and witnessed an unequalled era of peace and prosperity across the Mediterranean world. This course will track these developments between 27 BCE and 68 CE, from Augustus to Neo, by analysis of the major sources, films, and a survey of the archaeological remains of the early empire.


 
 
MLS799 4U

Professor J. Tomas Lopez
Thursdays | 6:25-9:05 pm | Merrick 309

Romanticism-from Gothic Novels to Horror Film

Romanticism can be seen as a rejection of the precepts of order, calm, harmony, balance, idealization, and rationality that typified Classicism in the 18th-century. Romanticism emphasized the individual, the subjective, the irrational, the imaginative, the emotional and the transcendental. Among the characteristics of Romanticism were a new view of the artist as a creator with an emphasis on imagination as a gateway to a spiritual truth and a predilection for the exotic, the remote, the mysterious, the weird, the occult, the monstrous, the diseased, and even the satanic.

This seminar looks at Romanticism from the ‘dark side’ of Art: Goya, Turner, Poe, Shelly and Stoker to the present. Topics include the Goya, the gothic novels of Shelly and Stoker and Poe’s short stories. At the end of the seminar the student will comprehend how early 19th century thinking led to the horror film of today and apply a critical analysis of the evolution and rise of scaring us to death as entertainment.


 

MLS696 01

MALS Director
Arranged | Arranged | Merrick 214 C

Directed Readings

A Directed Readings course allows you to work independently with a MALS professor, researching a topic of your choice. The MALS Director will be the advisor for all Directed Readings in Literature. For any other topic, you must find a professor in that field that is willing to act as your advisor.

Only students with a 3.0 GPA or higher will be able to enroll in a Directed Readings course. In order to register for the course, you will need to submit a 2 page proposal along with a bibliography of 10 academic sources, at least 2 weeks prior to the start of the semester.

The final paper must be a minimum of 15 pages, and be submitted to both the professor and the MALS office on the first day of final exams. Hard copies only will be accepted.

Proposals must be sent to the MALS Director and Frances before registering, and at least 2 weeks before classes begin.

Students are allowed two directed readings courses during their studies in the Program 

*MALS Directed Readings Papers Due May 10th *


 

MLS697 01

MALS Director
Arranged | Arranged | Merrick 214 C

Directed Readings

A Directed Readings course allows you to work independently with a MALS professor, researching a topic of your choice. The MALS Director will be the advisor for all Directed Readings in Literature. For any other topic, you must find a professor in that field that is willing to act as your advisor.

Only students with a 3.0 GPA or higher will be able to enroll in a Directed Readings course. In order to register for the course, you will need to submit a 2 page proposal along with a bibliography of 10 academic sources, at least 2 weeks prior to the start of the semester.

The final paper must be a minimum of 15 pages, and be submitted to both the professor and the MALS office on the first day of final exams. Hard copies only will be accepted.

Proposals must be sent to the MALS Director and Frances before registering, and at least 2 weeks before classes begin.

Students are allowed two directed readings courses during their studies in the Program 

*MALS Directed Readings Papers Due May 10th *


 

MLS810 01

MALS Director
Arranged | Arranged | Merrick 214 C

MALS Thesis

Before registering for a MALS Thesis students must meet with the MALS Director to discuss the project. Students are advised to also check the guidelines for writing a thesis on the Graduate School website: www.miami.edu/grad


 
 
MLS815 01

MALS Director
Arranged | Arranged | Merrick 214 C

MALS Project

Before registering for a MALS Project students must submit a proposal and meet with the MALS Director to discuss the project.


 
 
MLS820 01

MALS Director
Arranged | Arranged | Merrick 214 C

Research in Residence

Students needing extra time to complete their thesis may register for a Research in Residence course for 0 credit hours.