MLS601 1U

Professor Henry Green
Mondays| 6:25-9:05pm | MB 214F

Aspects of Creative and Reflective Thought

This course will examine a number of ways in which humans construct ideas of nature (often as the non-human world), our relations to such, and our place within it.  We will study a variety of sources—literary, visual, philosophical, and scientific; ancient and modern—as we pursue these interrelated questions across a long historical spectrum. 

*This is a MALS required core course

 


 
 
 
MLS 602 1U

Professor George Wilson
Tuesdays | 6:25-9:05pm | MB 122

Perspectives on Human Nature

Basic theories of human nature proposed by the humanities, the sciences, and the social sciences.  The course deals with insights, provided by different perspectives into human nature and related issues, such as the nature of the self and its relation to society, the impact of culture on self-perception, and the relation of thought to human action.  Special attention will be given to the historical development of theories of human nature and their implications for social and political policy.

*This is a MALS required core course

 


 

MLS 603 3U

Professor Manuel Huerta
Thursdays| 6:25-9:05pm | KPB 109

Theories of the Physical Universe

This course will examine a variety of theories and models of the physical universe including perspectives from various physical sciences and disciplines such as philosophy, religion, and history.

*This is a MALS required core course

 


 

MLS 611 2U

Professor David Graf
Thursdays | 6:25-9:05pm | TBD

Studies in the Acient World: Rome and Its Friendly Kings: Judea and Nabataea"

Rome’s Eastern Frontier was a continual problem, with a series of misfortunes and failures. Augustus implemented a series of buffer kingdoms on the Eastern Frontier as a defensive strategy. This course will pursue these policies and practices by investigating two of the better known of these client kingdoms, the Herodian kings of Judea and the Nabataean kings at Petra in Arabia. The literary sources and archaeological remains (regional settlements and sanctuaries in particular) will be emphasized, as well as a comparison of their similarities and differences, and their fortunes and fate under Roman rule.

Enrollment limited to 7 MALS students.


 

MLS 799 4K

Professor Tom Lopez
Wednesdays| 6:25-9:05pm | MB 214F

War & Propaganda

A graduate seminar exploring how War and Propaganda are depicted in Art, Film and Media. 
The celebration and condemnation of war and violence has been explored by artist since the beginning of recorded history. The class will concentrate on the function and obsession with these topics in art and film. 


The goal of the class is for the student to be able to analyze how different cultures view war, preparing for war and the aftermath of occupation and/or withdrawal.


 
 
MLS 621 2K

Professor Bruce Miller/ Eugene Clasby
Mondays| 6:25-9:05pm | MB 309

Page to Stage

The Outsider in Shakespeare - Shakespeare’s influence on the English speaking world and for all humanity cannot be overestimated. His insights about the human condition still resonate centuries after he wrote his plays. Through the examination of two of his best known works – Othello and The Merchant of Venice -- the course will focus on the nature of the outsider in society. The fear and misunderstanding generated by the alien in the closed culture of Elizabethan times seems as relevant today as it did 400 years ago.  Transported by these two plays, the class will enter Shakespeare’s world and observe how it is mirrored by our own. Class work will include a combination of literary and dramatic analysis and synthesis, the study of several video versions of Othello and The Merchant of Venice, and selected prepared readings from Shakespearean sonnets, and scenes from these plays using the reading techniques introduced in class.  Specific topics will include:  Shakespeare’s language, themes, and usage; his dramatic and literary structure; the interconnectedness of dramatic elements found in Shakespeare; and the Elizabethan world – intellectually and socially. 

Enrollment limited to 15 students                                                      

 


 
 
MLS 631 3K

Professor Edmund Abaka
Mondays | 6:25-9:05pm |TBD

Global Cultures: Religions, Communications, and Security

The course will provide an overview of world religions and cultures as a backdrop of effective communication for international professionals. The study of comparative religions and cultures will make students aware of special challenges in international and intercultural communication and the role of mass media in international relations. The course will be team taught bringing together a group of experts on different religions and cultures as well as media.


 

MLS 696 01

Professor Daniel Pals
Hours Arranged

Directed Readings

A Directed Readings course allows you to work independently with a MALS professor, researching a topic of your choice. The Director may be the advisor for all Directed Readings in Religious Studies. For any other topic, you must find a professor in that field that is willing to act as your advisor.

Only students with a 3.0 GPA or higher will be able to enroll in a Directed Readings course. In order to register for the course, you will need to submit a 2-page proposal along with a bibliography of 10 academic sources by May 6th. Proposals must be sent to the MALS office before registering. 

The final paper must be a minimum of 15 pages, and be submitted to both the professor and the MALS office on December 14th. Hard copies only will be accepted.

Students are allowed two directed readings courses during their studies in the Program 


 
 
MLS 697 01

Professor Daniel Pals
Hours arranged

Directed Readings

find a professor in that field that is willing to act as your advisor.

Only students with a 3.0 GPA or higher will be able to enroll in a Directed Readings course. In order to register for the course, you will need to submit a 2-page proposal along with a bibliography of 10 academic sources by May 6th. Proposals must be sent to the MALS office before registering. 

The final paper must be a minimum of 15 pages, and be submitted to both the professor and the MALS office on December 14th. Hard copies only will be accepted.

Students are allowed two directed readings courses during their studies in the Program 


 
 
MLS 810 01

Thesis Committee
Hours arranged

MALS Thesis

Before registering for a MALS Thesis students must submit a proposal and meet with the Professor Clasby to discuss the project. Students are advised to also check the guidelines for writing a thesis on the Graduate School website: www.miami.edu/gs


 
 
MLS 815 01

Project Committee
Hours arranged

MALS Project

Before registering for a MALS Project students must submit a proposal and meet with the Professor Clasby to discuss the project.


MLS 820 01

MALS Director 
Hours arranged

Research in Residence

Students needing extra time to complete their thesis may register for a Research in Residence course for 0 credit hours.