Imagining Culture(s), Rethinking Disciplines: A Conference on Anthropology and the Humanities | Schedule

Speakers' Bios | Registration, Hotel and Directions | Media

The College of Arts & Sciences Center for the Humanities at the University of Miami presents

Imagining Culture(s), Rethinking Disciplines:
A Conference on Anthropology and the Humanities

Friday-Saturday, April 1-2, 2011

 

 

*Photograph by Vanessa Meadu, 2007
www.meaduva.com

LOWE ART MUSEUM
1301 Stanford Dr.

University of Miami

 

Open to the public.  Registration required.
Visiting Faculty and General Public, click here
for information regarding registration fee.


*Co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology


Keynote: Dipesh Chakrabarty

Featured speakers: Erna Brodber amd Mabel Moraña

The concept of culture has become a vexed issue for the social science disciplines and the humanities. The “literary turn” in anthropology has focused attention on the conventions and politics of ethnographic representations, even as novelists and historians have been exploring ethnographic approaches in their writings, and claimed a share in the production of knowledge about peoples. Moreover, “culture” has been conceptualized in different ways across diverse disciplines and in different social-political contexts. In an age of globalization, non-Western and non-academic concepts of culture challenge the Eurocentrism of the traditional human sciences.  This conference encourages examination of the ways that an international perspective on the idea of culture unsettles the borders and status of disciplinary formations.

 




*A note from the photographer: The photo was taken in El Molo (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Molo) in Northern Kenya, a very remote area. The people survive from fishing in Lake Turkana, and from tourist groups that visit there, purchasing crafts, and paying a contribution for the privilege of taking the peoples' photos (as I did). Although the traditional language is all but lost, many aspects of their culture remain, and have evolved due to influences from other parts of Kenya, and Christianity. Many of the young people, including women, have gone to school, though there are few opportunities once they leave.