SHAKESPEARE IN MIAMI



A Caribbean Accent to Shakespeare's Voice


caribbean shakespeare Delpha Charles



Thursday  February 7, 2013
at 5:00pm

CAS Gallery
Wesley Foundation
1210 Stanford Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33146
Pavia Parking Map...

Cosponsored by the Department of English, Caribbean Literary Studies and Creative Writing Programs


A Caribbean Accent to Shakespeare’s Voice is a book of quotations, stories, “translations” of many of Shakespeare’s famous utterances and topics—from love and friendship to the supernatural—embellished by riveting Caribbean characters and scenes.

Born in Montserrat and having grown up in Antigua, Dr. Delpha Charles coined the word AfroCaro to describe herself and Caribbean natives of African descent. She holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Miami; she received her M.A. from NYU and her B.A. from Howard. She was a Professor of English for twenty years at Miami-Dade College and a Professor of English at Oakwood College, Huntsville.

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Looking at Lear:
Images from the Folger Picture Archive

 

Gail Kern Paster

Director Emerita
Folger Shakespeare Library

Wednesday, February 13, 2013
at 4:30pm

CAS Gallery
1210 Stanford Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33146
Pavia Parking Map...

Cosponsored by the Departments
of English and Theatre Arts


King Lear is replete with arresting stage tableaux: the aged king himself and his Fool, the naked body of Edgar disguised as Poor Tom of Bedlam, the mad Lear buffeted by the storm, Lear holding the dead body of Cordelia.

The 10,000 digitized Shakespeare images of the Folger picture archive provide an illustrated history of interpretation and reception including many examples from King Lear. What these images show us, however, is that in their efforts to render a true portrait of Shakespeare's Lear, every theatrical age ends up representing itself.

Gail Kern Paster was Director of the Folger Shakespeare Library from 2002 to 2011. The Folger houses the world’s largest collection of Shakespeare materials; as director, Paster made the Folger's materials more accessible to the public and strengthened its educational mission. She is the author of The Idea of the City and the Age of Shakespeare and Humoring the Body: Emotions and the Shakespearean Stage; she served as president of the Shakespeare Association of America and editor of Shakespeare Quarterly.

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The Passions of the Air in
King Lear
and Macbeth

 

Gail Kern Paster

Director Emerita
Folger Shakespeare Library

Thursday February 14, 2013
at 4:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
1300 Memorial Drive
3rd Floor Conference Room
Coral Gables, FL 33146



Because of the early modern belief in the connections between the body and the cosmos – microcosm and macrocosm – comparisons of the winds and tides to human passions are commonplace in the period's bodily discourses. "The Egyptians fought against the Egyptians,  the East wind riseth often against the West, the South against the North, the Winde against the tyde, & one Passion fighteth with another," writes Thomas Wright in The Passions of the Mind in General (1604).

Scholarly interest in these meteorological comparisons has tended to focus on the body rather than the weather, yet historicist investigation of the "ecology of the passions" requires attention to the transaction between the porous body of Galenic humoralism and its environment. This is especially true for the early modern period when "weather" was construed anthropocentrically, signifying an unpredictable, perhaps God-given set of calamitous local events and prodigies – storms, earthquakes, bloody rains, or battles in the sky.

Shakespeare capitalizes on the fear and wonder associated with violent weather at key moments in the drama – the thunder and lightning at the opening of Macbeth, the storm at the center of King Lear. This paper will take a new look at Shakespeare's weather and the macrocosm-microcosm analogy which gives it psychological import.

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Performance: King Lear


February 20 - March 2, 2013

Jerry Herman Ring Theatre
1312 Miller Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33146
305-284-3355


For more information and tickets, please visit: www.as.miami.edu/theatrearts/ring.html

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Post-performance discussions with UM Shakespeare professors, the director, and actors on Sunday, February 24th (Anthony Barthelemy and Eugene Clasby), and Tuesday, February 26th (Pamela Hammons and Mihoko Suzuki).