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SEPTEMBER 2015

Fall Reception (2015)

Fall Reception for Humanities Faculty & Graduate Students


Thursday
9-3-15
4:00 PM

CAS Gallery
For UM Faculty & Grad Students and by Invitation


 
Headshot of Professor Karl Gunther

‌Karl Gunther

Associate Professor of History, University of Miami

Reformation Unbound:
Protestant Visions of Reform in England, 1525–1590

Wednesday
9-9-15

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

Fundamentally revising our understanding of early English Protestantism, Karl Gunther argues that sixteenth-century English evangelicals were calling for reforms and envisioning godly life—typically associated with radical puritanism—in the earliest decades of the English Reformation. Along the way, the book offers new interpretations of central episodes in this period of England's history, such as the "Troubles at Frankfurt" under Mary and the Elizabethan vestments controversy, and ultimately casts the later development of puritanism as well as the history of radical Protestant thought in a new light.

Karl Gunther is Associate Professor of History at the University of Miami. His research focuses on the history of the English Reformation and the religious and intellectual history of Reformation Europe more broadly. He has been the recipient of numerous fellowships and grants, including from the Folger Shakespeare Library, and has published articles in Past and Present, The Journal of Ecclesiastical History, and History Compass. He currently serves as the Vice-President of the Southern Conference on British Studies.


Small bio photo of Abena Busia (for Humanities Calendar)

Abena Busia

Professor and Chair, Department of Women's and Gender Studies, Rutgers University

Locating the Politics of Feminist Knowledge: The "Women Writing Africa" Project

Negotiating Diasporas: Poems Old and New (Poetry Reading)


Thursday
9-10-15
3:30 PM

Public Lecture
Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited
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Friday
9-11-15
12:30 PM

Poetry Reading
CAS Gallery
Public Invited
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Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs in the Libraries (Calendar Image)

Cosponsored with the University of Miami Libraries

Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs in the Libraries


Friday
9-25-15
12:30 PM

Seminar:
School of Nursing, Executive Board Room
For UM Faculty & Grad Students
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Charles Eckman, 
Dean of Libraries, Otto G. Richter Library
Kelly Miller,
Associate Dean, Learning & Research Services
Timothy Norris,
CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow
Martin Tsang,
CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow

Engage in conversation about career opportunities in 21st-century libraries and cultural institutions with a distinguished panel of University of Miami Library administrators and postdoctoral fellows, whose research interests include the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Listen to their stories, learn about strategies to explore careers in libraries and archives as well as fellowship opportunities, and ask them your questions at this interactive session.

More Information >>


OCTOBER 2015

Stanford Logo (Orange Background)

GIF image of Frans de Waal book covers
 

Frans de Waal

C. H. Candler Professor of Psychology, Emory University

Humans as Animals: Primate Politics, Culture, and Morality


Thursday
10-15-15
7:00 PM

Public Lecture:
Storer Auditorium
Public Invited
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Friday
10-16-15
12:30 PM

Lunch Seminar:
Student Activities Center - Iron Arrow Room, Third Floor
For UM Faculty & Grad Students
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Over the last few decades, the study of primate behavior has moved the consensus away from human uniqueness in politics, culture, and morality as well as from a reluctance to ascribe emotion to animals. Professor de Waal will examine similarities between humans and other primates in power politics, transmission of knowledge and habits, and moral prerequisites, such as empathy and the sense of fairness. Based on his team’s research on apes, monkeys, and elephants at the Yerkes Primate Center, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Thailand, and elsewhere, de Waal will focus on specific, well-defined behavioral mechanisms that permit the complex social organization and extensive cooperation observed in monkeys, apes, and humans.

“De Waal’s most hopeful message is that peaceful behavior can be learned. This important and illuminating book [Our Inner Ape] should help our own species take that lesson in civility to heart.”
— Temple Grandin, The New York Times

Dr. Frans de Waal is C. H. Candler Professor of Psychology at Emory University and Director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Center. He is also Distinguished Professor at the University of Utrecht. He is the author of Chimpanzee Politics (1982), which compared chimpanzees involved in power struggles with human politicians, and most recently, The Bonobo and the Atheist (2013) and Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? (2016). His scientific work has been published in journals such as Science, Nature, and Scientific American. He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences (US), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences. In 2007, he was selected by Time as one of The Worlds’ 100 Most Influential People Today, and in 2011 by Discover as among 47 (all time) Great Minds of Science.

More Information >>


 
Headshot of Prof Jennifer Ferriss-Hill

‌Jennifer Ferriss-Hill

Associate Professor of Classics, University of Miami

Roman Satire and the Old Comic Tradition

Wednesday
10-21-15

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...

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Quintilian famously claimed that satire was tota nostra, or totally ours, but Jennifer Ferriss-Hill demonstrates that many of Roman satire's most distinctive characteristics derived from ancient Greek Old Comedy, in an innovative study that is the first book in English on this subject. She highlights in the writings of Lucilius, Horace, and Persius the features that they crafted on the model of Aristophanes and his fellow poets; the authoritative yet compromised author; the self-referential discussions of poetics that vacillate between defensive and aggressive; the deployment of personal invective in the service of literary polemics; and the abiding interest in criticizing individuals, types, and language itself.

Jennifer Ferriss-Hill is Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Miami. She received her A.B. in Classics summa cum laude from Princeton University (2002) and her Ph.D. in Classical Philology from Harvard University (2008), where she was the recipient of a Whiting Fellowship in the Humanities and a Derek C. Bok Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Teaching of Undergraduates. At the University of Miami, she has been awarded two Provost Research Awards, a Faculty Fellowship at the Center for the Humanities, and the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Scholarly and Creative Activities. She has published in Classical Philology, Transactions of the American Philological Association, The American Journal of Philology, Illinois Classical Studies, and Paideia on Latin poets such as Catullus, Virgil, and Horace, on Sabellic dialects, and Varro’s On the Latin Language.


Graphic for William Walker Library Lecture Series

William Walker

Professor, Otto G. Richter Library; Former Dean and University Librarian

Art Libraries and Visual Resources


Tuesday
10-27-15
12:30 PM

School of Nursing, Executive Board Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

Professors William Walker, Perri Lee Roberts, and Nathan Timpano will discuss major art information resources and libraries, their unique and important collections as well as their fellowship programs.

Special focus will be given to resources at the Getty Research Institute, the Frick Collection's Art Reference Library, and the Metropolitan Museum's Watson Library.  The session will also include recommendations for finding images for research and publication, processes for obtaining rights and permissions, and hints on the most cost effective resources to consult.


NOVEMBER 2015

 
Headshot of Prof Kathryn Freeman

‌Kathryn Freeman

Associate Professor of English, University of Miami

British Women Writers and the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1785-1835

Wednesday
11-11-15

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

In this study of newly recovered works by British women, Kathryn Freeman traces the literary relationship between women writers and the Asiatic Society of Bengal, otherwise known as the Orientalists. By contrast to their male counterparts, who tended to mirror the Orientalist distortions of India, women writers like Phebe Gibbes, Elizabeth Hamilton, Sydney Owenson, Mariana Starke, Eliza Fay, Anna Jones, and Maria Jane Jewsbury interrogated these distortions from the perspective of gender. This book revises the Romantic paradigm of canonical writers as replicators of Orientalists’ cultural imperialism to accommodate the differences between male and female authors with respect to India.

Kathryn Freeman is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Miami in the fields of British Romanticism, Orientalism, Blake studies, and women’s literature. She is the author of Blake’s Nostos: Fragmentation and Nondualism in The Four Zoas (SUNY 1997). She is currently completing A Guide to William Blake, a companion to Blake’s cosmology and historical context, and is at work on a book about the relationship among gender, creativity, and epistemology in Coleridge’s poetics, entitled,“The New Moon with the Old Moon in her Arms”: Phases of the Imagination in Coleridge


Dreyfus Treason Trial image

 

Vanessa Schwartz

Professor of History, Art History, and Film, University of Southern California

Get That Picture!: Speed and the Invention of the Global Media Event in Fin-de-Siècle Paris


Thursday
11-12-15
7:00 PM
Public Lecture:
CAS Gallery
Public Invited
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This lecture examines the emergence of photojournalism in Paris in the last third of the nineteenth century in relation to the importance of changing technologies of speed, especially in relation to the history of transportation. It contextualizes one of the most notorious global media events, “The Dreyfus Affair,” in a broader visual culture of the news in which photography and film emerged as the key modes of news reporting.

“[In Spectacular Realities], Schwartz weaves a multilayered history of the evolution of mass entertainments in Paris during the 19th century . . . an engrossing study.”
— F. Burkhard, Choice

Vanessa R. Schwartz is Professor of History, Art History and Film at the University of Southern California, where she also directs the Visual Studies Research Institute. She is the author of It’s So French! Hollywood, Paris, and the Making of Cosmopolitan Film Culture (2007), Spectacular Realities: Early Mass Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Paris (1998), and Modern France: A Very Short Introduction (2011). She was awarded a 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship and a Cullman Center Fellowship at the New York Public Library.

More information >>


Graphic for William Walker Library Lecture Series

William Walker

Professor, Otto G. Richter Library; Former Dean and University Librarian

Humanities Resources in South Florida Collections


Friday
11-13-15
12:30 PM

School of Nursing, Executive Board Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

Humanities resources in our own backyard are frequently overlooked.  Join Professors William Walker and Robin Bachin to explore resources which complement UM collections. Discussion will include collections at HistoryMiami, Vizcaya, the Black Archive, the Stonewall Archive, and the Miami Dade Public Library.


DECEMBER 2015

 
Headshot of Professor Traci Ardren

‌Traci Ardren

Professor and Chair of Anthropology, University of Miami

Social Identities in the Classic Maya Northern Lowlands:
Gender, Age, Memory, and Place

Wednesday
12-2-15

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

Using new primary data from her excavations at the sites of Yaxuna, Chunchucmil, and Xuenkal, and new analysis of data from Dzibilchaltun in Yucatan, Mexico, Traci Ardren presents a series of case studies on how social identities were created, shared, and manipulated among the lowland Maya. She argues that the interacting factors of gender, age, familial and community memories, and the experience of living in an urban setting were some of the key aspects of Maya identities. Viewing the archeological evidence through the lens of recent social theory, Ardren demonstrates that material culture and its circulation are an integral part of the discourse about social identity and group membership.

Traci Ardren is Professor and Chair of Anthropology at the University of Miami. She co-directs the Proyecto Arqueológico Xuenkal, which explores the role of trade and economic change in the rise of Chichén Itzá from the perspective of a major site along the trade routes of the northern plains of Yucatán, Mexico. She directs the Matecumbe Chiefdom Project, which investigates the political organization and environmental adaptation of the pre-Hispanic occupants of the Florida Keys. She has curated a number of exhibits at the Lowe Art Museum at the University of Miami, including The Jaguar’s Spots: Ancient Mesoamerican Art from the Lowe Art Museum (2010) and Flowers for the Earth Lord: Guatemalan Textiles from the Permanent Collection (2006). She is the editor of Ancient Maya Women (AltaMira) and The Social Experience of Childhood in Ancient Mesoamerica (University Press Colorado). Her work has appeared in such journals as Antiquity, World Archaeology, Journal of Field Archaeology, and Latin American Antiquity.


JANUARY 2016

Modernities Lecture by Sabine Hake "Ferdinand Lassalle, the first Socialist Celebrity"
Presented by
the Center for the Humanities
Modernities Interdisciplinary Research Group

Sabine Hake

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Texas, Austin

Ferdinand Lassalle, the First Socialist Celebrity


Tuesday
1-19-16
4:30 PM

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited
Listen to the Podcast

“I believe in Ferdinand Lassalle, the Messiah of the nineteenth century…” thus begins a socialist version of the Apostles’ Creed popular among his followers. Today he is best remembered as one of the founding fathers of German Social Democracy. But at the time, Lassalle was also the object of intense emotional attachments and fantasy productions. As part of an emerging socialist mythology, his celebrity status attests to an unusually personal engagement with political questions made possible by new literary genres and forms of political engagement. At first glance, the public fascination with his personal life seems far removed from the realities of working-class life and antithetical to the socialist ethos of community. But as this talk will demonstrate, the socialist movement in fact relied heavily on the products of the culture industry to strengthen socialist commitments and forge proletarian identifications. This point is important not only for a better understanding of the history of socialism but also for a historical perspective on the merging of political culture and celebrity culture today.

Sabine Hake holds the Texas Chair of German Literature and Culture at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research on Weimar and Third Reich culture and German cinema focuses on the relationship between cultural practices and aesthetic sensibilities, on the one hand, and social movements and political ideologies, on the other. She is currently working on two book projects: a reassessment of German cinema from the perspective of media convergence and a study on the German proletariat as an imaginary subject in literature, art, film, and political theory.



 
Mary Lindemann (calendar headshot)

‌Mary Lindemann

Professor and Chair of History, University of Miami

The Merchant Republics:
Amsterdam, Antwerp, and Hamburg, 1648-1790

Wednesday
1-20-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

The Merchant Republics analyzes the ways in which three major economic powerhouses – Amsterdam, Antwerp, and Hamburg – developed dual identities as “communities of commerce” and as republics over the course of the long eighteenth century (c. 1648–1790). In addition to discussing the qualities that made these three cities alike, this volume also considers the very real differences that derived from their dissimilar histories, political structures, economic fates, and cultural expectations. While all valued both their republicanism and their merchant identities, each presented a different face to the world and each made the transition from an early modern republic to a modern city in a different manner.

Mary Lindemann is Professor of History and Chair of the Department of History at the University of Miami. She is the author of four books and of numerous articles. She has also been the recipient of several major grants and awards, among them the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities; the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health; the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences and the Humanities; the Flemish Institute for Advanced Study; and the Shelby Cullom Davis Center, Princeton University.

 


‌‌Bio photo for David Konstan (NYU) for Antiquities Lecture
Presented by
the Center for the Humanities
Antiquities Interdisciplinary Research Group
Cosponsored by the Department of Classics and the Department of Religious Studies

David Konstan

Professor of Classics, New York University

Of Love and Loyalty: The View from Classical Antiquity


Thursday
1-21-16
4:30 PM

CAS Gallery
Public Invited
 
Listen to the Podcast

The German sociologist Georg Simmel asked: “If love continues to exist in a relationship between persons, why does it need faithfulness?” Love alone should be enough. Is loyalty a distinct kind of bond, more durable than love? If so, are the reasons for being faithful different from those for loving? In Professor Konstan's talk, he will suggest that in classical Greece and Rome, love and loyalty were in fact more closely associated than they are today. Examples will be drawn from texts by Aristotle, Cicero, Euripides, and Edward Albee.

David Konstan is Professor of Classics at New York University; he previously taught at Brown University and Wesleyan University. His research focuses on ancient Greek and Latin literature, especially comedy and the novel, and classical philosophy. In recent years, he has investigated the emotions and value concepts of classical Greece and Rome, and has written books on friendship, pity, the emotions, and forgiveness. He has also written on ancient physics and atomic theory, and on literary theory, and is currently working on a book on the ancient Greek conception of beauty, and on a verse translation of the two Senecan tragedies about Hercules. He has been President of the American Philological Association, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


Jon Meacham Book Covers (GIF)
Jon Meacham - Centennial Pulitzer Prizes
This program is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council in partnership with the University of Miami Center for the Humanities. It is part of the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative, a joint venture of the Pulitzer Prizes Board and the Federation of State Humanities Councils in recognition of the 2016 centennial of the Prizes.

Jon Meacham

Presidential Historian

The Art of Leadership:
Lessons from the American Presidency


Tuesday
1-26-16
7:00 PM

Maurice Gusman Concert Hall
Public Invited

Jon Meacham explores what 21st-century leaders in different fields of endeavor can learn from the greatest moments of our common past. This presentation — non-partisan in content and tone — ranges from Jefferson’s pragmatism to Jackson’s management of public opinion, JFK’s capacity to recover from his own mistakes, and Reagan and FDR’s ability to manage conflicting egos. Meacham discusses how history can inform the decisions all of us make every day in positions that demand creative and innovative solutions.

“Meacham wisely has chosen to look at Jefferson through a political lens, assessing how he balanced his ideals with pragmatism while also bending others to his will.”  
— Jill Abramson, The New York Times Book Review

Jon Meacham is the author of Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power (2012), a No. 1 New York Times bestseller that has been named one of the best books of the year by The New York Times Book Review and The Washington Post, among others. His most recent book, Destiny and Power, chronicles the life of George H. W. Bush, drawing on his personal diaries and on extraordinary access to the president and his family, thereby painting an intimate and surprising portrait of an intensely private man who led the nation through tumultuous times. Meacham received the Pulitzer Prize for American Lion, his bestselling 2008 biography of Andrew Jackson. He is a regular contributor on Meet the Press, Morning Joe, and Charlie Rose.‌

More Information >>


FEBRUARY 2016

Bio photo for Robin Fleming
This lecture is presented with the support of the ACCAC Distinguished Lecturers Program

Robin Fleming

Professor of History, Boston College

Living with the Fall of Rome: Britain in the "Dark Ages"


Friday
2-5-16
4:30 PM

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited

The lecture examines six different communities in post-Roman Britain engaged in recycling old Roman ceramics and glass. We will learn something about each of these groups–the kinds of people they were, the recent histories of the places in which they lived, the strategies they developed for procuring old Roman pots and glass, and then about the ways they chose to use this material. We will thereby broaden the story of the transition from Roman to not-Roman to include not just politics, but the lived experience of people who were having to figure out how to be in a period of radical material loss.

Professor Fleming is a Professor of History at Boston College, and a 2013 MacArthur Fellow. Her books include Britain After Rome: The Fall and Rise, 400-1070 (2011), Kings and Lords in Conquest England (2004), and Domesday Book and the Law: Society and Legal Custom in Early Medieval England (2003). She has received grants or fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities; the Harvard Society of Fellows; the Bunting Institute; the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton; the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies at Harvard University; and the Guggenheim Foundation. She is a fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, the Royal Historical Society, and the London Society of Antiquaries.


Graphic for William Walker Library Lecture Series

William Walker

Professor, Otto G. Richter Library; Former Dean and University Librarian

National Archives


Tuesday
2-9-16
12:30 PM

School of Nursing, Executive Board Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

Professor Scott Heerman and Graduate Student Joseph Snyder join William Walker for a discussion revolving around the exceptional collections of the U.S. National Archives, the National Archives of Ireland, and National Archives in the UK. The team will present research strategies, fellowship opportunities, and access tips. The conversation will also help participants understand the differences between national libraries and national archives.


Professor Amie Thomasson (calendar bio photo)

‌Amie L. Thomasson

Professor of Philosophy, University of Miami

Ontology Made Easy

Wednesday
2-10-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream

 

This volume argues that ontology faces a challenge that comes from the “easy approach to ontology”—that many ontological questions can be answered by undertaking trivial inferences from uncontroversial premises. This book aims to develop the easy approach to ontology, showing how it leads to both a first-order simple realism about the disputed entities and a form of meta-ontological deflationism that takes ontological disputes themselves to be misguided, since existence questions may be answered by straightforward conceptual and/or empirical work. It also aims to show the easy approach to be a viable and attractive alternative to the quagmire of hard ontology.

Amie Thomasson is Professor of Philosophy and Cooper Fellow in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Miami. She is the author of Ordinary Objects and Fiction and Metaphysics, and co-editor (with David W. Smith) of Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. In addition, she has published more than 50 book chapters and articles on topics in metaphysics, metaontology, fiction, philosophy of mind and phenomenology, the philosophy of art, and social ontology.

 


2014 - 2015 Center for the Humanities Fellows (Calendar thumbnail photo)

2014-2015 Center for the Humanities Fellows Symposium - Part I


Friday
2-12-16
3:00 PM

School of Nursing
Executive Board Room
For Humanities Faculty & Grad Students
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Session 1 (3:00pm - 4:00pm)
1. "'Taste of Luxury, Taste of Necessity' : Food Culture and the Literary Imagination in Renaissance Italy," Laura Giannetti (MLL)
2. "Ginastera’s First Film Score: A Malambo for the Cinema," Deborah Schwartz-Kates (Musicology)

Session 2 (4:00pm - 5:00pm)
1. "She Gives Birth," Pamela Geller (Anthropology)
2. "A New Puzzle about Bodily Awareness," Rina Tzinman (Philosophy)


Stanford Logo (Orange Background)

Machu Picchu GIF for Richard Burger
 

Richard Burger

Charles J. MacCurdy Professor of Anthropology, Yale University

Violence, Warfare, and Religion in the Emergence of Early Peruvian Civilization


Thursday
2-18-16
7:00 PM

Public Lecture:
Storer Auditorium
Public Invited
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By considering defensive architecture, weapons, iconographic depictions, and paleopathology, Professor Burger will demonstrate that warfare was not a major factor in the development of early Andean civilization. This belies recent claims that humans are intrinsically warlike and that war provided the stimulus for the development of complex societies.

[In Unveiling the Mystery of the Incas], Yale anthropology professor Burger and Salazar, curator of the Machu Picchu collection at Yale's Peabody Museum, present . . . a welcome, in-depth resource for anyone interested in pre-Columbian archaeology and the anthropology of sacred sites.”
— Whitney Scott, Booklist

Richard Burger is Charles J. MacCurdy Professor of Anthropology at Yale University and Curator in the Division of Anthropology at the Peabody Museum. An archaeologist specializing in the emergence of civilization in the Central Andes, Burger has carried out research in Peru for over two decades. His books on South American prehistory include Chavin and the Origin of Andean Civilization (1992), and Machu Picchu: Unveiling the Mystery of the Incas (2008). Burger also served as Chair of the Senior Fellows of Pre-Columbian Studies at Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C. and is currently the President of the Institute of Andean Research (NY).

More Information >>


"Kay Pacha: Reciprocity with the Natural World Conference"

The Kay Pacha Symposium is presented in co-sponsorship with the Center for the Humanities, the Department of Anthropology, the Program in Latin American Studies, the Miami Institute for the Americas, and the University of Miami Libraries.

 

Symposium
Kay Pacha: Reciprocity with the Natural World


Saturday, February 20, 2016
Lowe Art Museum
 

This symposium, featuring specialists in ancient Andean art and archaeology, will present the latest research on objects from the exhibit that speak to Andean relationships with the natural world. The symposium, open to the general public, will be followed by an opportunity for the audience and scholars to enter into a conversation about the different values we can bring to understanding our delicate ecosystems.

Click here to view the program


The Present Future of the University and the Humanities Lecture Series


Jeffrey J. Williams

Professor of English, Carnegie Mellon University

Brave New University (Public Lecture)


Shaping a Scholarly Career:
Alternatives to Monograph and Articles (Lunch Seminar)


Generations and Contemporary American Fiction
(Cosponsored by the Department of English)


Thursday
2-25-16
4:30 PM

Brave New University
Otto G. Richter Library,
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited
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More Information >>

Friday
2-26-16
12:30 PM

Lunch Seminar
School of Nursing, Executive Board Room
For UM Faculty & Grad Students
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More Information >>

Friday
2-26-16
4:00 PM

Generations and Contemporary American Fiction
Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited
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More Information >>

 


MARCH 2016

2014 - 2015 Center for the Humanities Fellows (Calendar thumbnail photo)

2014-2015 Center for the Humanities Fellows Symposium - Part II


Thursday
3-3-16
3:00 PM

School of Nursing
Executive Board Room
For Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

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Session 1 (3:00pm - 4:00pm)
1. "The Carnivalization of the Political Public Sphere: Elizabeth Inchbald’s Nature and Art," Alisa Bé (English)
2. "Documents of Doubt: Conceptual Art and Photography," Heather Diack (Art & Art History)

Session 2 (4:00pm - 5:00pm)
1. "Reception of Spanish-Language News in Miami: Cultural Proximity, Social Positioning and the Fragmentation of a 'Hispanic Audience,' " Sallie Hughes (Communications)
2. "A Great Society for Africa: Gulf Oil Corporation and Johnson’s U.S-Africa Policy, 1964-68," Ashley Marie Mateiro (History)


 
Professor Nicholas Patricios (calendar headshot)

‌Nicholas N. Patricios

Professor and Dean Emeritus of Architecture, University of Miami

The Sacred Architecture of Byzantium:
Art, Liturgy, and Symbolism in Early Christian Churches

Wednesday
3-16-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

Nicholas N. Patricios offers a comprehensive survey, from the age of Constantine to the fall of Constantinople, of the nexus between buildings, worship and art. Beyond categorizing and describing the churches themselves, which are richly illustrated with photographs, plans and diagrams, the author interprets the sacred liturgy that took place within these holy buildings, tracing the development of the worship in conjunction with architectural advances made up to the fifteenth century. This sumptuous book is an essential guide not only to individual features of the churches but also to the wider significance of Byzantine art and architecture.

Nicholas N. Patricios is Professor and Dean Emeritus of Architecture and former Master of Stanford Residential College at the University of Miami. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Architecture from the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, where he received the Gresty Prize; a postgraduate diploma in Town and Regional Planning with Distinction from the University of Manchester, where he was awarded the Heywood Medal; and a Ph.D from University College London. He is the author of Building Marvelous Miami: An Architectural and Urban History as well as over 50 academic articles in scholarly journals. He has been the recipient of many awards including a Fulbright Fellowship to Greece and a Visiting Scholarship to the American Academy in Rome.

 


The Present Future of the University and the Humanities Lecture Series


Timothy Burke

Professor and Chair of History, Swarthmore College

Designing the Liberal Arts for Uncertainty (Public Lecture)


The Seating Chart:
The Ritual Life of Sovereignty in Africa's Cold War
(Cosponsored by the Department of History)


Thursday
3-17-16
4:30 PM

Designing the Liberal Arts for Uncertainty
Otto G. Richter Library,
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited
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Friday
3-18-16
2:00 PM

The Seating Chart
Otto G. Richter Library,
Third Floor Conference Room 
Public Invited
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Listen to the Podcast

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Cosponsored by
the Departments of History and English

Mark Salber Phillips

Professor of History, Carleton University

On Historical Distance


Friday
3-25-16
12:30 PM

School of Nursing
Executive Board Room
For Faculty & Grad Students

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Participants will be asked to read portions of On Historical Distance (Yale University Press, 2013). Readings are password protected. Password will be provided after registering for the event.

For centuries, historians have looked to the idea of historical distance as a path to objectivity, elevating distance and detachment as central tools of historical thought. The idea acquires greater value, however, when distance is reconceived in relation to the range of purposes that shape all forms of representation.  The result is a more flexible form of understanding that has important implications not only for historical studies but also for literature, art history, and ethics.

Mark Salber Phillips is Professor of History with a cross appointment in the Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art, and Culture at Carleton University. He is the author of many books, including Society and Sentiment: Genres of Historical Writing in Britain, 1740-1820 (2000) and On Historical Distance (2013), awarded the 2014 Wallace K Ferguson Prize given by the Canadian Historical Association. His current research includes philosophy of history and historiography, intellectual history, and European historical thought in the Renaissance, Enlightenment, and the late twentieth century.

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APRIL 2016

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Marcyliena Morgan

Professor of African and African American Studies; Founding Executive Director, Hiphop Archive and Research Institute, Harvard University

Hiphop and the Global Influence of American Cultural Politics


Wednesday
4-6-16
5:00 PM

"Crates to Classroom: The Birth of the Hiphop Archive at Harvard University"
(Presented by the Office of Academic Enhancement)

CAS Gallery

Thursday
4-7-16
12:30 PM

Seminar: "Black Lives Matter"
Discussion with Professor David Ikard's AAS290 students
Dooley Memorial, Room 209

Thursday
4-7-16
7:00 PM

Public Lecture:
Storer Auditorium
Public Invited
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Friday
4-8-16
12:30 PM

Lunch Seminar: "Defending and Representing Hiphop Culture: 'Did You Mean What You Said?' "
Philosophy Seminar Room, Ashe Administration, Rm 735
For Faculty & Graduate Students
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Fans are generally unaware of the political, cultural, and aesthetic aspects of hiphop, especially its complex ideology regarding citizenship, knowledge, truth, language, representation, innovation, and inclusion. Global hiphop mainly conveys progressive American politics of gender, racial, and social class inclusion, transforming both American and global politics in the process.

“In The Real Hiphop, Marcyliena Morgan has written a brilliant account of the origins of hiphop and the process through which it is created and evolves, from its most elemental and raw forms into the highly processed and polished versions that have become the lingua franca of popular American culture. Morgan – the founder of the world’s only hiphop archive – raises the analysis of hiphop to an entirely new level of scholarship, explicating it as a linguistic, sociological, and political phenomenon.”
— Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor, Harvard University

Marcyliena Morgan, Professor of African and African American Studies, is founding executive director of the Hiphop Archive and Research Institute at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for Afro-American Research at Harvard University. Dr. Morgan has conducted field research on the African Diaspora, as well as on identity and language in the USA, England, and the Caribbean. Her books include Discourse and Power in African American Culture (2002), The Real Hiphop: Battling for Knowledge, Power, and Respect in the Underground (2008), and Speech Communities (2014).

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‌Berit Brogaard

Professor of Philosophy, University of Miami

The Superhuman Mind:
Free the Genius in Your Brain

Wednesday
4-13-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
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Berit Brogaard and Kristian Marlow study people with astonishing talents—memory champions, human echolocators, musical virtuosos, math geniuses, and synesthetes who taste colors and hear faces. What these gifted individuals have in common is that through practice, injury, an innate brain disorder, or even more unusual circumstances, they have managed to gain a degree of conscious access to the potent processing power below our awareness. Delving into the neurological underpinnings of these abilities, the authors reveal how we can acquire some of them ourselves—from perfect pitch and lightning fast math skills to supercharged creativity.

Berit Brogaard, D.M.Sci., Ph.D., is a Professor of Philosophy and the Director of the Brogaard Lab for Multisensory Research at the University of Miami. Her educational background includes a medical degree in neuroscience and a doctorate in philosophy. Her areas of research include perception, synesthesia, blindsight, consciousness, neuro-psychiatry and emotions. She has written over 100 peer-reviewed articles and some 400 popular articles on neuroscience and health issues. She is the author of On Romantic Love (Oxford) and Transient Truths (Oxford).

 


Publishing Seminar (Humanities Calendar 2016)

 

Expanding Career Opportunities for Humanities PhDs

Adina Berk
Senior Editor, Oxford University Press

Matthew McAdam
Senior Acquisition Editor, Johns Hopkins University Press


Thursday
4-14-16
3:30 PM

Seminar:
School of Nursing, Executive Board Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students
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Have you ever considered transitioning from the academy to a career in scholarly publishing? This overview of publishing outlets for scholarly work in the humanities will address topics such as: today’s scholarly publishing landscape, and possible career pathways from academia to publishing.

Adina Popescu Berk is Senior Editor and Group Lead in Humanities and History in the Reference group at Oxford University Press. She has been an editor at Cambridge University Press, Basic Books, Westview Press, and HarperCollins, and her editorial career has spanned the breadth of scholarly publishing, including reference, monographs, textbooks, trade books, and journals. She holds a doctorate in history from Columbia University.

Matthew McAdam is a Senior Acquisitions Editor at Johns Hopkins University Press. He acquires and commissions academic monographs, course books, and trade titles throughout the humanities focusing in particular on literary studies, classics and ancient history, intellectual history, and the history of science. Prior to joining Hopkins in 2009, he was the philosophy editor at Lexington Books, an imprint of Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. He has a doctorate in philosophy from Georgetown University.


Publishing Seminar (Humanities Calendar 2016)

 

Scholarly Publishing Seminar

Adina Berk
Senior Editor, Oxford University Press

Matthew McAdam
Senior Acquisition Editor, Johns Hopkins University Press


Friday
4-15-16
12:00 PM

Seminar:
School of Nursing, Executive Board Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students
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An overview of publishing outlets for scholarly work in the humanities. What do editors look for? How should I decide where to publish my work? How to approach editors? How do I write a book proposal? These and any questions you bring will be the subject of this seminar.

Adina Popescu Berk is Senior Editor and Group Lead in Humanities and History in the Reference group at Oxford University Press. She has been an editor at Cambridge University Press, Basic Books, Westview Press, and HarperCollins, and her editorial career has spanned the breadth of scholarly publishing, including reference, monographs, textbooks, trade books, and journals. She holds a doctorate in history from Columbia University.

Matthew McAdam is a Senior Acquisitions Editor at Johns Hopkins University Press. He acquires and commissions academic monographs, course books, and trade titles throughout the humanities focusing in particular on literary studies, classics and ancient history, intellectual history, and the history of science. Prior to joining Hopkins in 2009, he was the philosophy editor at Lexington Books, an imprint of Rowan and Littlefield Publishers. He has a doctorate in philosophy from Georgetown University.


Publishing Seminar (Humanities Calendar 2016)

 Cosponsored by the University of Miami Libraries

The Future of Academic Publishing

Peter Berkery
Executive Director, Association of American University Presses (AAUP)

Peter Potter
Director of Publishing Strategy, University Libraries, Virginia Tech


Wednesday
4-20-16
4:00 PM

Seminar:
Otto G. Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited
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What will the university press of the future look like? This panel, intended for faculty and graduate students in the humanities as well as librarians, will begin by laying out the current status of academic publishing (e.g., impact of the e-book; declining library sales; consequence of the acquisition of presses by conglomerates); it will then turn to discuss prospects for the future (e.g., publishing on digital platforms that enable interactive features; open access). Topics to be addressed include coming changes in the nature of publishing operations, business models, and organizational contexts.

Peter Berkery has been Executive Director of AAUP since early 2013. He was previously Vice President and Publisher for the US Law Division at Oxford University Press. Berkery has a BA in Classical Studies from Boston College, and an MA and a JD from The American University, as well as a Master of Laws in Taxation from George Washington University.

Peter Potter, who was editor-in-chief at Cornell University Press since 2006, became Director of Publishing Strategy for University Libraries at Virginia Tech in January 2016. Before Cornell, he worked at The Pennsylvania State University Press as editor-in-chief and associate director, and held editor and acting director positions at the Wesleyan University Press. Throughout his nearly 30 years in university press publishing, Potter has been a leader in efforts to integrate new technologies into scholarly publishing practices, specifically working to leverage the complementary strengths of a university press and a university library to elevate faculty research, for example by helping to launch the Office of Digital Scholarly Publishing at Penn State--one of the first centers to be jointly sponsored by a university library and a university press. He received his bachelor's degree in history from Virginia Tech and his master's degree in history from the University of Virginia.