This section covers political and economic relations between the European Union and countries in its Eastern Neighborhood (including relations with Russia, Eastern countries covered by European Neighborhood Policy and Eastern Partnership).


EUROPEAN NEIGHBORHOOD POLICY

The EU introduced European Neighborhood Policy in 2004 as an instrument to regulate its relations with its neighbors.  The ENP offers “a privileged relationship, building upon a mutual commitment to common values” but remains distinct from the process of enlargement.  The policy provides with a coherent approach that at the same time allows the Union to develop tailor-made relations with each country. Central to the ENP are the bilateral Action Plans between the EU and each ENP partner (12 of them were agreed). These set out an agenda of political and economic reforms with short and medium-term priorities of 3 to 5 years. Following the expiration of the first Action Plans succession documents are being adopted. 
The ENP builds upon existing agreements between the EU and the partner in question: Partnership and Cooperation Agreements (PCA) or Association Agreements (AA). Implementation of the ENP is jointly promoted and monitored through the Committees and sub-Committees established in the frame of these agreements. The European Commission under its own responsibility publishes each year the ENP Progress Reports.

The ENP framework is proposed to the 16 of EU’s closest neighbors, 6 of which are in the East (Armenia, AzerbaijanBelarusGeorgiaMoldova, and Ukraine)


EASTERN PARTNERSHIP

Eastern Partnership is a regional and multilateral co-operation initiative launched in Prague in May 2009. The European Commission put forward concrete ideas for further enhancing the EU relationship with: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine. This would imply new association agreements including deep and comprehensive free trade agreements with those countries willing and able to enter into a deeper engagement and gradual integration in the EU economy. It would also allow for easier travel to the EU through gradual visa liberalization, accompanied by measures to tackle illegal immigration.

According to the European Commission the Partnership will also promote democracy and good governance, strengthen energy security, promote sector reform and environment protection, encourage people to people contacts, support economic and social development and offer additional funding for projects to reduce socio-economic imbalances and increase stability.


THE EU RELATIONS WITH RUSSIA

The recent Enlargement brought Russia closer to the EU’s borders. Russia is the EU’s third biggest trade partner, with Russian supplies of oil and gas making up a large percentage of Russia’s exports to Europe. As well, Russia is an important market for EU goods and services. Over the past 15 years, the EU and Russia have developed a dense network of political institutions and diplomatic contacts. Economic interdependence has grown stronger as well, with the EU becoming Russia’s most important foreign trade partner, and Russia becoming the EU’s largest energy supplier.

The Ongoing cooperation is based on 4 specific policy areas. These “common spaces”, cover economic issues & the environment; Freedom, Security & Justice; External Security; and Research & Education, including cultural aspects.


EUROPEAN NEIGBOHOOD POLICY (ENP)

The European Union Institutions and relevant European Union External Action Service Delegations Websites:


THINK TANKS, NGOS, RESEARCH CENTERS:


SITES WITH RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS:


EASTERN PARTNERSHIP UNDER ENP

The European Union Institutions:
European Union External Action Service

Think Tanks, NGOs, Research Centers:
Eastern Partnership Community

Sites with relevant publications:
ENPI


THE EU RELATIONS WITH RUSSIAN FEDERATION

The European Union Institutions:
European external action service

EU-Russia Common Spaces


THINK TANKS, NGOS, RESEARCH CENTERS


SITES WITH RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS: