Colloquia Announcements


Wednesday, 25th April 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Dr. Geoff Sutcliffe

Department of Computer Science
University of Miami

will present

Making Belnap's "Useful 4-Valued Logic" Useful

In 1977 Nuel Belnap published two articles, "How a Computer Should Think" and "A Useful Four-Valued Logic", in which he defined a four-valued logic called FDE (First Degree Entailment). However, FDE does not allow entailments within statements, and no conditional connective is defined. As such, it is not really computationally "useful". This work proposes conditional connectives to add to FDE, and describes the implementation of a reasoning tool for FDE with a conditional connective, with experimental results. With the addition of a conditional connective FDE starts to become truly computationally useful.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Wednesday, 18th April 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Dr. Vladimir N. Uversky

Department of Molecular Medicine
University of South Florida

will present

Dancing Protein Clouds: Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack stable tertiary and/or secondary structure under physiological conditions in vitro. They are highly abundant in nature and have functional repertoire which is very broad and complements functions of ordered proteins. Often, intrinsically disordered proteins are involved in regulation, signaling and control pathways. Functions of IDPs may arise from the specific disordered form, from inter-conversion of disordered forms, or from transitions between disordered and ordered as well as between ordered and disordered conformations. The choice between these conformations is determined by the peculiarities of the protein environment, and many IDPs possess an exceptional ability to fold in a template-dependent manner. These proteins are often key players in protein-protein interaction networks being highly abundant among hubs.  Regions of mRNA which undergo alternative splicing code for disordered proteins more often than they code for structured proteins. This association of alternative splicing and intrinsic disorder helps proteins to avoid folding difficulties and provides a novel mechanism for developing tissue-specific protein interaction networks. IDPs are tightly controlled in the norm by various genetic and non-genetic mechanisms. Alteration in regulation of this disordered regulators are often detrimental to a cell and many IDPs are associated with a variety of human diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, amyloidoses, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes and others.  Therefore, there is an intriguing interconnection between intrinsic disorder, cell signaling and human diseases. Pathogenic IDPs, such as ?-synuclein, tau protein, p53, BRCA1 and many other disease-associated hub proteins represent attractive targets for drugs modulating protein-protein interactions. Several strategies have been elaborated for elucidating the mechanisms of blocking of the intrinsic disorder-based protein-protein interactions.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Wednesday, 11th April 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Lindsay Thomas

Department of English
University of Miami

will present

The WhatEvery1Says Project: Machine Learning and the Humanities

This talk will give an overview of the use of computational methods of text analysis in literary studies, focusing on a project I co-direct: the WhatEvery1Says project (WE1S). WE1S uses methods in computational text analysis to study public discourse about the humanities at large data scales, focusing on journalistic news media from about 1981 to the present. Our hypothesis is that digital methods can help us learn new things about how news media sources portray the humanities. For example, are there sub-themes beneath the familiar dominant clich?s and memes about the traditional value of the humanities? How do different parts of the world or different kinds of sources compare in the way they think about the humanities? How do mainstream media position people from different racial, ethnic, gender, first-generation-student and other groups relative to the humanities?  How do media articles by or addressed specifically to such groups compare with mainstream media in how they depict this relationship? In the process of our work, we are also developing tools and guidelines to create an open, generalizable, and replicable digital humanities methodology - one based on standards that the data-intensive sciences have advanced under the rubrics of "open science" and "open lab.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Wednesday, 4th April 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Michelle Afkhami

Department of Biology
University of Miami

will present

The Unseen Majority: 
Linking Microbiome Effects on Host Fitness to Genome-wide Expression,
Coexpression Network structure, and Nonadditive Natural Selection

Despite being invisible to the naked eye, microbes are everywhere. Not only do all plants and animals play host to diverse assemblages of microorganisms, these hidden players often provide critical benefits necessary for their host's survival. A key goal of molecular biology has been to understand the genomic basis of how these microbes benefit their hosts, but has focused on pairwise association between a host and a single microbe which ignores the reality that organisms interact with many microbes simultaneously. While ecological literature has embraced this complexity and demonstrated synergistic, non-additive effects of multiple microbes on host fitness, it cannot determine the mechanistic and genomic basis of how organisms respond to these interactions. In this talk, I will combine ecological experimental designs with genomic and computational tools to provide insight into the molecular basis of synergistic effects of microbiomes on host plant performance. In particular, I will show how two important plant-associated symbionts - mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia - interactively influence: (1) genome-wide expression using gene-at-a-time approaches and enrichment analyses, (2) molecular interactions among genes using differential coexpression network analyses, and (3) non-additive selection on host fitness using genotypic selection analyses. By taking an integrative approach, this work collectivity provides a new perspective on the ecologically-important interaction between plants and their microbiomes.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Wednesday, 28th March 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Sean Kenny

CIO, Carnival Cruise Line

will present

Tech Talk in the Sea Suite with Carnival's CIO

On any given day, Carnival Corporation has over 100 ships sailing worldwide, and one of our newest ships, Carnival Horizon is scheduled to make her maiden voyage this spring!  We pride ourselves on delivering memorable vacations to our guests and our ships features day and nighttime entertainment like stage shows, musical performances, casinos and more. Our guests feel right at home, too - think comfy stateroom accommodations, attentive service, delicious food and drink - and they enjoy the experience against the backdrop of some of the world's most beautiful ports.  Today we bring high tech to the high seas to transform our cruise ships into seaborne smart homes. Our teams are passionate about introducing new technology onboard the ships to truly enhance the cruising experience, and redefine what it means to have a personal 24/7 concierge onboard.  Join us at this Pizza Seminar as Chief Information Officer of Carnival Cruise Line, Sean Kenny gives an executive's perspective on how our team truly enhances our guest experience, and how he launched his career in a digital world.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Wednesday, 21st March 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Dr. Julia Dallman

Department of Biology
University of Miami

will present

Computer-assisted Phenotypic Analyses in Zebrafish Models of Autism

Recent breakthroughs from high-throughput sequencing in humans, genome engineering in animals, genetically encoded calcium sensors to capture brain dynamics, to machine learning to quantify phenotypes/symptoms are providing unprecedented insights into the molecular genetics of brain function. The recent advances in genomic engineering have allowed our lab to collaborate with labs in human genetics to recapitulate human neuropsychiatric conditions in zebrafish models as a means to delineate underlying mechanisms. In my talk, I will discuss how computer-assisted analyses of phenotypes in our zebrafish models of autism are helping us to understand the biological mechanisms associated with negative symptoms that range from sleep disturbance and epilepsy to gastrointestinal distress.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Wednesday, 7th March 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Dr. Lynn Perry

Department of Psychology
University of Miami

will present

Using Automated Measures to Examine Language Experiences in Early Intervention Classrooms

Although parent speech has become a subject of increasing study and intervention, less is known about speech in childcare settings. What is known often comes from observations at the level of classroom rather than at the level of individual infant. For example, teacher language quality is assessed as a static trait of the teacher, missing the fact that classrooms are busy interactive places in which different infants have different types of conversations with each other and with their teachers. It is only with the use of automated measurement and big behavioral data that we can understand how different infants' experiences vary even within a shared classroom and what consequences that variability can have on their development. I will present data from two studies utilizing automated measures of language and movement in early intervention classrooms. Together, the results of these studies suggest that children's interactions with peers and teachers have cascading consequences for their future language development. Our application of automated measurement provides new insight into the dynamics of the classroom environment and consequences for language development in at-risk and delayed infants - insights that could not be obtained without the power of big data. Refreshments will be served.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Wednesday, 28th February 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Dr. Diana K. Ter-Ghazaryan

Department of Geography
University of Miami

will present

Isn't that Spatial?: Maps and the Power of Location

Geospatial technology is increasingly relevant to our lives in the 21st century. Join Dr. Ter-Ghazaryan, Lecturer and Director of Geospatial Technology Program at the Department of Geography, for an interactive presentation on the role that maps and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) play in our everyday lives.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Monday, 5th March 2018, 12:15am, Richter Library Conference Room 343

Dr. Liang Liang
Georgia Institute of Technology

will present

Biomedical Image Analysis - Analyzing the Images of Bio-Particles, Cells, and Human Heart Valves

I will present my research on biomedical image analysis which includes modeling, simulation and inference. My research focuses on the development of new algorithms and methods to resolve challenges in this field by utilizing techniques in computer vision, machine learning, and biomechanics.  I will start from biological image analysis for studying cellular processes, including fluorescence imaging, object detection and tracking. The images from just one experiment may contain tens of thousands of objects (e.g. bio-particles) with high density, which makes it almost infeasible to manually analyze the image data. To resolve this challenge, I developed a novel multiple hypothesis based tracking method using state space representation and mixed integer programming, which automatically recovers the object trajectories and outperforms traditional methods. From the tracking results, we were able to infer the role of a chemical compound from the cellular behaviors.  Then I will present my recent work on medical image analysis, especially image-based patient-specific modeling of human aorta and heart valves. Soft tissue biomechanical modeling and finite element (FE) simulation have shown promising results for medical diagnosis (e.g. evaluating thoracic aortic aneurysm) but have limited clinical translatability due to heavy manual workload and long simulation time.  To resolve the bottlenecks, I developed machine learning based methods that can automatically build FE models from images and serve as a fast surrogate of FE simulation for stress analysis. I will also show machine learning based methods for soft tissue microscopy image analysis and lumbar spine image analysis.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Seminar Series. 


Wednesday, 21st February 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Brian McNoldy

Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
University of Miami

will present

Ensemble Techniques Applied to Ocean Profiling Floats in an
Observing System Simulation Experiment

Large ensembles of trajectories can be simple to generate, but very challenging to turn into a meaningful, digestible, and actionable end product. In the atmospheric and oceanic sciences, examples include ensembles of tropical cyclone forecast tracks over several days and ensembles of float forecast positions over several years. This paper specifically addresses the latter, but the techniques described apply to both.  The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) project is a major multi-year and multi-institutional effort to better understand the complex biogeochemical processes in the Southern Ocean and their influence on the global climate system.  Observations in that hostile part of the world are sparse and expensive, so a high-fidelity numerical model simulation was created to mimic the real world as closely as possible.  This simulation, or "nature run", is the foundation of an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) which is designed to help guide and inform decision-makers and optimize physical resources.  Using the nature run, we introduce thousands of synthetic floats at specified locations along realistic cruise routes; those floats are then allowed to drift with the ocean currents for years. We employ several methods to analyze and visualize the resulting track ensembles, including trajectory density, target area probability, and data depth.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Monday, 19th February 2018, 12:15am, Cox 42

Mr. Hongfu Liu
Northeastern Universityi

will present

From Consensus Clustering to K-means Clustering

Consensus clustering aims to find a single partition which agrees as much as possible with existing basic partitions, which emerges as a promising solution to find cluster structures from heterogeneous data. It has been widely recognized that consensus clustering is effective to generate robust clustering results, detect bizarre clusters, handle noise, outliers and sample variations, and integrate solutions from multiple distributed sources of data or attributes. Different from the traditional clustering methods, which directly conducts the data matrix, the input of consensus clustering is the set of various diverse basic partitions. Therefore, consensus clustering is a fusion problem, not a traditional clustering problem. In this talk, I will introduce the category of consensus clustering, illustrate the K-means-based Consensus Clustering (KCC), which exactly transforms the consensus clustering problem into a (weighted) K-means clustering problem with theoretical supports, talk about some key impact factors of consensus clustering, extend KCC to Fuzzy C-means Consensus Clustering. Moreover, this talk includes how to employ consensus clustering for heterogeneous, multi-view, incomplete and big data clustering. Derived from consensus clustering, a partition level constraint is proposed as the new side information for semi-supervised clustering.  Along this line, several interesting applications based on the partition level constraint, such as feature selection, domain adaptation, gene stratification are involved to demonstrate the extensibility of consensus clustering. Some codes are available for practical use.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Seminar Series. 


Friday, 16th February 2018, 12:00am, Cox 42

Mr. Zhengming (Allan) Ding
Northeastern Universityi

will present

Knowledge Transfer for Face Recognition

It is essential to mimic human cognitive process to adapt previous well-learn knowledge to facilitate the new challenging face recognition tasks. In this presentation, I focus on two topics, i.e., missing modality and one-shot learning. First of all, we may always confront the problem that we have no target face available in the training stage, which arises when the face data are multi-modal. To overcome this, we first borrow an auxiliary database with complete modalities, then propose a two-directional knowledge transfer to solve the missing modality issue. Secondly, we may always confront that we only have one training sample for some persons. It is challenging for existing machine learning approaches to mimic this way since limited data cannot well represent the data variance. To this end, we propose to build a large-scale face recognizer, which is capable to fight off the data imbalance difficulty. Specifically, we develop a novel generative model to synthesize meaningful data for one-shot classes by adapting the data variances from other normal classes.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Seminar Series. 


Wednesday, 7th February 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Craig Pottinger
Chief Technical Officer and Co-Founder of Graupel LLC

will present

Leveraging AR & ML to find your Personalized Fit

Retailers and Ready to Wear brands have largely survived by inconveniently coercing customers to purchase generically sized apparel. However, there aren't enough sizes to categorize the full range of body shapes that people have. The unfortunate result is customers struggle to find clothes that uniquely fit them. The problem of improper fit has directly led to billions of dollars in apparel returns each year. At Graupel, we are putting the customer first.  Graupel is an omnichannel apparel brand that leverages technology to ensure customers get their personalized fit.  In this presentation with Craig Pottinger - Chief Technical Officer and Co-Founder of Graupel - he examines how they provide a unique fit to their customers. He dives into the technology stack that enables Graupel's business model and examines the current challenges around building an automated pipeline - a pipeline that starts with a 3D avatar of the customer and ends with a pattern made custom to the customer's body shape. Furthermore, he explores how various Machine Learning and Augmented Reality techniques would improve automation, quality control and conversion rates.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Wednesday, 31st January 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Alex Rubinsteyn
The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

will present

Algorithmic Selection of Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines

This talk will discuss computational methods used to design personalized therapeutic cancer vaccines. Therapeutic cancer vaccines, unlike preventative prophylactic vaccines, aim to mobilize an immune response against an established cancer. Since each patient's cancer contains a unique pattern of mutations, a different vaccine must be made for each patient. The starting point of this personalization process is DNA sequencing of both the patient and their tumor. The differences between the patient/tumor genomes reveal a pool of potentially targetable mutations, which are then further filtered by computational predictions of how mutations affect proteins and statistical models of which mutations can be recognized by the immune system. The aim of this talk is to demonstrate the very direct role which computational methods can play in a patient's cancer treatment.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Wednesday, 24th January 2018, 5:00pm, UB230

Dr. Shouraseni Sen Roy
Department of Geography and Regional Studies
University of Miami

will present

Geovisualizing Miami through Space and Time

Geovisualization is used to refer to visualization techniques used for analyzing and presenting large geospatial datasets. This presentation showcases the results of various geospatial research questions based on Miami through space and time. It involves the use of multiple years of data and spatial datasets at different scales.

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series. Refreshments will be served at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of Ungar.


Previous Colloquia Announcements