Ann Marie Alfonso-Forero

Ann Marie Alfonso-Forero is a Ph.D. candidate in ethnic American and postcolonial literatures at the University of Miami.  Her work focuses on the manner in which postcoloniality affects identity formation in narratives of immigration to the United States.  Her dissertation is entitled, “Translating Postcolonial Pasts: Immigration and Ethnic American Identities in the fiction of Bharati Mukherjee, Elizabeth Nunez, and Jhumpa Lahiri.”

B.A. in English and Spanish, Boston University; M.A. in English, University of Miami (2005); Ph.D. in English, University of Miami


Lara Cahill-Booth

Lara Cahill-Booth is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English. Her doctoral thesis is entitled, “Theater of the Arts: Textualities and Caribbean Narratives of Place” focusing on the embodiment and mythopoetics of place in Caribbean literature and performing arts. She was a CLS Research Assistant from 2007-2010, serving as the copy editor and managing editor of Anthurium: A Caribbean Studies Journal and coordinating the 2007 conference “The Asian Experience in the Caribbean and the Guyanas.” She co-edited the Spring/Fall 2009 issue of Anthurium, “The Asian Experience in the Caribbean: A Special Double Issue,” featuring criticism, fiction, and artwork from that conference.

B.A. in English and Spanish, Virginia Tech, (2000); M.A. English in English, University of Miami, (2005); Ph.D. in English, University of Miami


Marta Fernandez Campa

Marta Fernandez Campa is a third year Ph.D. student in Caribbean literature at the University of Miami. Her work focuses on how different notions of ‘mourning,’ as well as politics of location can function as forms of critical (and ethical) engagement in Caribbean Anglophone and Hispanophone literature and visual culture. She has participated in conferences with the African Literature Association, University of Miami, Caribbean Studies Association and Caribbean Philosophical Association.

B.A. Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); DEA (Diploma de Estudios Avanzados, M.A. equivalent) in Caribbean literature in Britain; Complutense University, Madrid; Ph.D. in English, University of Miami Fulbright Student (2008-present)

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Yi Huang

Yi Huang is a Ph. D. candidate in English at the University of Miami. Her work examines the social and identity formations of Asian community in the Americas. Her dissertation is entitled, “Borderland without Borders: Chinese Diasporic Women Writers in the Americas.”

B.A. in English, Guangxi Normal University (1993); M.A. in English, Amoy University (2004); M. A. in English, University of Maine (2006); Ph. D in English, University of Miami


Elizabeth Kelly

Elizabeth Kelly is a second year Ph.D. student in Caribbean Literature at the University of Miami. Her work focuses on the relationship between contemporary Atlantic speculative fiction and fantastic elements of American and Caribbean slave narratives.

B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies, New York University (2005), M.A. in English, Florida Atlantic University (2008); Ph.D. in English, University of Miami

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Michelle Ramlagan

Michelle Ramlagan is a Ph.D. candidate in Caribbean Literature at the University of Miami. Her work focuses on literary representations of the environment in women's writing in the Global South. She is currently working on her dissertation entitled, “Ecofeminist Nations: Postcolonial Women's Contestations of Environmental Discourses.”

B.A. in English, Morgan State University (2004); M.A. in English, Tulane University (2006); Ph.D. in English, University of Miami

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Carmen Ruiz-Castaneda

Carmen Ruiz-Castaneda is a Ph.D. candidate in Caribbean Literature at the University of Miami. Her work focuses on the inter-relationships between the Caribbean and other postcolonial spaces. Her dissertation is entitled, “Three Poets and a Painter: The Baroque Imaginations of Jose Lezama Lima, Derek Walcott and Seamus Heaney.”

B.A. in English/Honors, Villanova University (2004), M.A. in English, University of Miami (2007); Ph.D. in English, University of Miami  


Josune Urbistondo

Josune Urbistondo is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English. She was a CLCS Research Assistant for Spring 2010 and graduate student co-organizer of the Global Caribbean: Interrogating the Politics of Location in Literature and Culture Symposium. Her interests include gender, intelligibility, and belonging in contemporary Anglophone, Hispanophone Caribbean, and Latino Literature. Her dissertation is entitled, “Caribbean Bodyscapes: The Politics of Sacred Citizenship and the Transpersonal Body.”

B.A. in English, Florida International University (2003); M.A. in English and American Literature, New York University (2006); Ph.D. in English, University of Miami 


Sydney Owens

Sydney Owens is a third year Ph.D. student in the Department of English. She was the CLCS Research Assistant for Fall 2010 serving as an assistant for Anthurium: A Caribbean Studies Journal. Her interests include gender, sexuality, and transnationalism in contemporary Anglophone and Hispanophone Caribbean Literature. 

B.A. in English, Southern Methodist University (2005); M.A. in English, University of Miami (2009); Ph.D. in English, University of Miami