There are four ways of majoring in Classics, that is, four separate “tracks” to fulfill the requirements. Generally speaking, undergraduates are introduced to the subject in two ways: learning languages, Latin or Ancient Greek (or both); and taking survey or theme courses.

LANGUAGE COURSES (GRE AND LAT):      

Beginning language courses are offered on a three semester rotation. Advanced (202 and above) language courses consist of readings in a selected Greek or Roman author, such as Homer, Horace, Catullus, or Tacitus. Assignments average 30 to 40 lines per class for poetry and 1 to 2 pages for prose, somewhat less in 300-level courses, somewhat more in the 400-level courses. Careful translation and syntactical analysis of the text are coupled with thematic discussion. In each class, there are occasional translation quizzes, a midterm, and a final. Upper level language courses (202 or higher) are typically for Writing Credit (WC).

SURVEY/THEME COURSES (CLA):

Classes in the cultures of antiquity present primary materials in English and include survey courses, such as Greek civilization and Roman civilization, as well as themed courses, such as “Greek and Roman Mythology,” “Self and Other in the Ancient World,” and “Greek Tragedy.” In the future, courses such as “Women in Antiquity,” “The Decadence of the Late Roman Empire,” and “Classical Aesthetic Theory,” among others, will be added. Survey/Theme Courses are typically for Writing Credit (W).

Students may also take courses offered in other departments and approved by the Department of Classics as counting toward the major; some of these courses arecross-listed or co-listed with the Department of Classics. A list of these courses will be provided each term.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

Track 1: Greek (30 credits)
Greek 101, 102, 201
Six courses at the upper level (202 and above) in Greek. Greek 201 counts toward this requirement.
Two survey/theme courses; at least one CLA

Track 2: Latin (30 credits)
Latin 101, 102, 201 
Six courses at the upper level (202 and above) in Latin. Latin 201 counts toward this requirement.
Two survey/theme courses; at least one CLA

Track 3: Latin and Greek (36 credits)
Latin 101, 102, 201 and Greek 101, 102, 201
Three courses at the upper level (202 and above) in Latin and three courses at the upper level (202 and above) in Greek. Latin 201 and Greek 201 count toward this requirement.
Two survey/theme courses; at least one CLA

Track 4: Classical Civilization (30 credits)
Latin 101, 102, 201 or Greek 101, 102, 201
One further course in either Latin or Greek at the upper level (202 and above)
Six survey/theme courses; at least four CLA