‌David F. Driscoll, Ph.D. (Stanford University)
Visiting Assistant Professor

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305-284-2910

David F. Driscoll received his Ph.D. from Stanford in 2016, where he was a Geballe Dissertation Prize Fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center. His research focuses on Homer and his ancient reception from the standpoint of performance. His dissertation, Acting the Exegete: Homeric Quotation and Interpretation in Imperial Literary Symposia, analyzed the many uses to which Homer is put in these fictionalized evening banquets of the elite. He has also pursued interests in early Greek poetry in a digital humanities project entitled Mapping Greek Lyric: Places, Travel, Geographical Imaginary, accessible at http://lyricmappingproject.stanford.edu.


‌Jennifer Ferriss-Hill, Ph.D. (Harvard University)
Associate Professor

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305-284-9834

Jennifer Ferriss-Hill received her A.B. in Classics summa cum laude from Princeton University (2002) and her Ph.D. in Classical Philology from Harvard University (2008), and joined the University of Miami in 2009. She was the recipient at Harvard of a Whiting Fellowship in the Humanities and a Derek C. Bok Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Teaching of Undergraduates, and at the University of Miami she has been awarded Provost Research Awards, a Faculty Fellowship at the Center for the Humanities, and the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Scholarly and Creative Activities. She has published in CP, TAPA, AJP, ICS, and Paideia on Latin poets such as Catullus, Virgil, and Horace; on Sabellic dialects and Varro’s De lingua latina; and on Old Comedy. Her first book, Roman Satire and the Old Comic Tradition, was published with Cambridge University Press in 2015 and received the CAMWS First Book Award (2016).


‌Rebecca Katz, Ph.D. (Harvard University)
Visiting Assistant Professor

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305-284-2910

After earning her PhD this past May, Dr. Katz is very excited to be joining the faculty here at the University of Miami as a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Classics department. As a scholar, her main focus is on Roman cultural history, especially issues of competition and conflict, as well as memory and monumentality. (She also have a soft spot for animals, both ancient and modern.) Dr. Katz has a great deal of interest in the field of numismatics, especially Roman Republican coinage, and as an instructor she constantly seeks to work with film and other elements of pop culture as a means of connecting with the ancient world. This past semester Dr. Katz taught two parts of the Classics Department's introductory Latin sequence and a lecture course on sports and society. This coming spring Dr. Katz will be teaching a lecture on Roman Civilization as well as two additional Latin classes, including a reading course on Cicero.


‌John Kirby, Ph.D. (University of North Carolina)
Professor of Classics

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305-284-6326

John T. Kirby chaired the Programs in Classical Studies and in Comparative Literature at Purdue University for many years before coming to the University of Miami. He has published five books and numerous articles and reviews, and his website, CORAX (www.corax.us), was one of the very first classics websites on the Internet, appearing in 1997. Kirby has won teaching awards at the departmental, college, university, state, and national levels. His research interests include rhetorical and poetic theory, ancient and modern; Roman oratory; modern screen media and the classics; and French and Italian authors of the 20th and 21st centuries.


‌John Paul Russo, Ph.D. (Harvard University)
Department Chair

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305-284-3989

John Paul Russo has published books and essays on the theory of criticism, ethnicity, and history of culture. The recipient of three Fulbright Fellowships, most recently (2006) to the University of Salerno, he has been visiting professor at the universities of Palermo, Rome, and Genoa. He is book review editor of Italian Americana and an editor of Rivista di Studi Nord Americani. He has received the UM Faculty Senate's Distinguished Faculty Scholar Award and Outstanding Teaching Award, and a Cooper Fellowship. In 2006 his Future without a Past: The Humanities in a Technological Society won the Thomas N. Bonner Award. His study of representations of Italy, Italians, and Italian Americans since the Renaissance, co-written by Robert Casillo and entitled The Italian in Modernity, was published by the University of Toronto Press in 2011.


‌Wilson Shearin, Ph.D. (University of California at Berkeley)
Associate Professor

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305-284-5404

Wilson Shearin joined the University of Miami faculty from Stanford in 2010. His research focuses above all on the intersection of philosophy and literature in antiquity, particularly in the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Favorite ancient authors include Empedocles, Plato, Lucretius, Persius, and Seneca, but his work ranges also into reception, with recent writing on Denys Lambin, Saussure, and Nietzsche. He has published The Language of Atoms (Oxford, 2015) and Dynamic Reading (Oxford, 2012), and he is currently completing Thick-witted Minerva (On stupidity in Roman-period philosophical culture) and The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy.


‌Han Tran, Ph.D. (University of California at Berkeley)
Lecturer

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305-284-6326

Han Tran received her Ph.D. in Classics from the University of California at Berkeley in 2006. She has taught at UC Berkeley, The Ohio State University, and the University of Oregon before joining the faculty at the University of Miami in August, 2010. She has also edited and authored a number of (forthcoming) children's books on topics ranging from Norse myth to Southern Africa's Kalahari desert. One of her immediate and long-term goals is to produce educational materials that are exciting to a broad public. To this end, she has co-founded a non-profit publishing press designed precisely to realize this vision.