‌David Ikard, Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin Madison, 2002)
Professor of English
Africana Studies: 305-284-6340 / Building 37 Z- 1204
English: 305-284-5596  
Email

David Ikard specializes in African American literature. His interests include black feminist criticism, hip hop culture, black masculinity and whiteness studies. His essays have appeared in African American Review, MELUS, Palimpsest, African and Black Diaspora Journal, The Journal of Black Studies, and Obsidian III. He is the author/co-author of three books. Breaking The Silence: Toward a Black Male Feminist Criticism (2007) reconsiders the role of black men in feminism and identifies intraracial patterns of complicity in dominant modes of power that undermine even the most earnest and informed anti-sexist and anti-racist efforts. Co-authored with Martell Teasley, Nation of Cowards: Black Activism in Barack Obama's Post-Racial America (2012) explores the disconnect between the national hype over Barack Obama's historical election to the presidency and the ever-increasing economic distress of the black community that Attorney General Eric Holder broached in his controversial "race speech" in 2008. It received the Best Scholarly Book Award from DISA in 2013. Blinded by the Whites: Why Race Still Matters in the 21st Century (2014) uses black cultural and gender theories to engage the persistence of racial profiling, economic inequality between blacks and whites, disproportionate numbers of black prisoners, and disparities in health and access to healthcare. In addition, it sheds light on the shifting discourse of white supremacist ideology, including post-racialism, neoliberalism and colorblind politics, that frustrates black self-determination, agency, and empowerment in the 21st century. His current project, Loveable Racists, White Messiahs, and Magical Negroes, investigates the tenacity and cultural capital of white redemption narratives in literature and popular media from Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin to Kathryn Stockett’s best-selling-book-cum-blockbuster-and-Oscar-Award-winning movie The Help.


Affiliated Faculty

Dr. Robin Bachin
Department of History

Dr. Anthony Barthelemy
Department of English

Dr. Jomills Braddock
Department of Sociology

Dr. Ann Brittain
Department of Anthropology

Dr. Russell Castronovo
Department of English

Dr. Marvin P. Dawkins
Department of Sociology

Dean Rita Deutsch
Department of English

Dr. Richard J. Grant
Department of Geography and Regional Studies

Dr. Robert Halberstein
Department of Anthropology

Mr. J. Tomas Lopez
Department of Art and Art History

Dr. David Luis-Brown
Department of English

Dr. Michelle Maldonado
Department of Religious Studies

Dr. L. Herns Marcelin
Department of Anthropology

Dr. Robert F. Moore
School of Education

Dr. Brenna M. Munro
Department of English

Dr. John Murphy
Department of Sociology

Dr. Sandra Paquet
Department of English

Dr. Lindsey Tucker
Department of English

Dr. Kate Ramsey
Department of History

Dr. Patricia Saunders
Department of English

Dr. Donald Spivey
Department of History

Tsitsi Wakhisi
School of Communication

Dr. George Wilson
Department of Sociology

Dr. Ashley White
Department of History

Part-time Faculty

Dr. Preston W. Marshall
Africana Studies

Dr. Pierre-Michel Fontaine
Africana Studies

Dr. Robert Strain
FMU