UM Senior Making Science Sensible

Former Southridge High School Student returns to her Alma Mater as University of Miami Mentor to Enhance Science Curriculum as part of “Science Made Sensible” Program

University of Miami senior Farrah Mohammed returned to her roots, Miami Southridge Senior High School, as a mentor, just as she was mentored by a UM student when she attended high school there. Farrah was a member of Science Made Sensible, a program that focuses on advancing the scientific curiosity and learning of middle school and high school students by incorporating hands-on and inquiry-based activities into the curriculum. Farrah developed innovative lesson plans in her role as resident scientist for Southridge High School students with an interest in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics).

Farrah Mohammed at the Phi Beta Kappa Key of Excellence Award Ceremony

In addition to being a member of the Science Made Sensible program, Farrah is a Biology major with minors in Mathematics, Chemistry, and Anthropology. She is also affiliated with several other organizations at UM, including Phi Delta Epsilon, Women in Minority Medicine, American Medical Student Association, Global Brigades, Camp Kesem and FUNDAY.  Further, as part of her undergraduate honors thesis, she conducts biomedical engineering research in neuroengineering at the Miller School of Medicine, in which she works to reduce hemorrhaging in stroke and traumatic brain injury patients.      

"Returning to my alma mater has been a 180-degree reversal of what Miami Southridge has meant to me," said Farrah. "My alma mater is where I sought advice, acceptance and knowledge. To have my mentors turn now into teaching peers has forced me to take on the welcomed challenge of relating to students, applying my undergraduate studies and research, lending advice and creating dynamic lesson plans to get each student engaged. It has been a privilege to teach, tutor, and mentor at an establishment that has been and will always be home to me. I am gratified in seeing my former students and hearing of their accomplishments. Once a Spartan always a Spartan.”

The Science Made Sensible program works in collaboration with UM’s Civic Engagement High School Partnership, an innovative partnership between the University of Miami and Miami-Dade County Public Schools that promotes a college-going culture among traditionally underserved students.  The program addresses the disparities in high school education in Miami-Dade County Public Schools that leave many underserved students unprepared for a college education by improving access to resources for college preparedness and increasing aptitude in the skills necessary for collegiate success.

“Having Farrah participate in the High School Partnership as a UM mentor for students from her alma mater is a testament to the power and impact of this program," shared Dr. Robin Bachin, associate professor of history at the University of Miami. "While a student at Southridge, she participated in the partnership through her history class. Having her go back to her school as a college student who has achieved so much success shows the students that no matter what the challenges, college is within reach and their goals are attainable with hard work and perseverance. She has made her mark at UM and is an inspiring role model.”

 “Farrah is a hardworking and motivated student.  Through the SMS program she dedicated her time and talents to the students at her alma mater by helping create innovative and engaging lesson plans and then implementing them in the classroom," said Dr. Michael Gaines, professor of biology. "Farrah was so passionate about her role as resident scientist that she went well above and beyond the expectations of the program to make a difference in her students’ lives.”

The Office of Civic and Community Engagement is accepting student applications for the Science Made Sensible Program. For more information and/or to obtain an application, please contact civicengagement@miami.edu


 

 

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April 24, 2017